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Re wiring problem

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Cadergray, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Hello to whoever is willing to be my saving grace. I have an 83 special that I am turning into a cafe racer. I want to run the bike without an ignition and kickstart only. I am having troubles bypassing the ignition and I only want to run the bike for a little bit just to make sure everything works fine on it. I have the red wire from the rectifier to an income 20amp and to the positive terminal on the battery. I also have the rectifier and TCI grounded to the negative terminal. After I can successfully run the bike I want to add the headlight and new turnsignals. No horn no starter and no ignition, at least for now.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Another picture
     

    Attached Files:

  3. All you need to attach to make bike run is the red (red/white) wire for the tci and the coils thats it and bike will run
    I use a toggle switch from battery to TCI
     
  4. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    So I just run a hot wire into the red/white and the coils?
     
  5. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Is there an extra barebones diagram I can look at, Ive never wired anything before?
     
  6. Jim

    Jim Beyond the edge, is the unknown. Here be Dragons XS650.com Supporter Top Contributor

    Look in the Tech section. There's diagrams there.
     
  7. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Ok thank you I appreciate it!
     
    Jim likes this.
  8. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    So I got the bike to run and I was super jazzed about it. I proceeded to pit everything back on to ride it for the first time, but then I had no spark. So I'm pretty frustrated right now and I don't know what happened to the bike in the 5 minutes it took to pit it back together. Thoughts?
     
  9. Make sure you have voltage to the TCI and the coils
     
  10. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Ok will do thank you
     
  11. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    I have power to the coils and TCI.
     
  12. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    But still no spark
     
  13. If you have power to TCI and coil you should have spark?
     
  14. Double check your connections
     
  15. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Connections all seem fine
     
  16. When TCI goes bad most of the time you don’t Have voltage to coil
     
  17. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Ok i can rewire it back together and go from there
     
  18. 5twins

    5twins XS650 Guru Top Contributor

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    If you "hot wire" it, it will be on all the time and have power running to the TCI and coil. I'm pretty sure the TCI has a safety feature built into it that shuts it down after about 5 or 10 minutes if the bike isn't running. This protects it and the coil from overheating and burning out. If you must "hot wire" it, it would probably be best to put a toggle switch on the hot line, or a bullet connection you could unplug, when you're not running the bike, so you could turn the power off.
     
    lakeview likes this.
  19. Cadergray

    Cadergray XS650 Member

    Ok I set it up with a toggle switch and the bike fires right up. I discovered a small oil leak and made a new gasket for that. I still have one issue with the clutch and the kickstarter, if I have the clutch adjusted and the bike in neutral and I go to kick it, it doesn't turn the bike over and I just kick through it. But when I back the screw to adjust the clutch out the bike kicks over. How can I fix this issue?
     
  20. 5twins

    5twins XS650 Guru Top Contributor

    19,567
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    You're setting the adjuster screw too tight and it's disengaging the clutch. For setting that worm adjuster screw, you should screw it in until it bottoms then back it out slightly, like 1/8 of a turn. I "fan" the clutch lever as I tighten the adjuster screw. By that I mean I pump the lever in and out just through it's freeplay range. I don't pull it all the way in and disengage the clutch, just move it through it's freeplay range. What this does is stack the assortment of balls and pushrods running through the cases tightly together, and this gives you the best (tightest) adjustment possible. When "fanning" the lever while tightening the screw, I'm often able to get it to go in about another 1/4 turn tighter. If left where it was before the "fanning" operation, it would result in an adjustment setting that was waaaay loose.
     

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