2003 Royal Enfield 500 Deluxe

Raymond

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Thank you for your help, Jim.

Have had a further look around on that Internet and it might be that there is a simple way ahead:

s-l640.jpg



This RM21 stator is advertised for Royal Enfield, to give a higher Wattage than the Indian alternator. Importantly, has two-wire output so should connect straight to the Power box.

Gonna speak to the seller tomorrow - they have a 1/2 day Wednesday, how quaint! - to see if it's the correct fitment and ask if compatible with the present rotor. It's probably all very simple stuff, but if you don't know . . .
 

Raymond

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Thank you, Bob. It does seem very clean. But then again, bike has only done about 6,000 miles.

The RM21 stator now ordered, also a decomp cable which will hopefully fit the shiny chrome lever. Also, a pressed aluminium number plate which should be a big improvement over the large plastic monstrosity fitted on there now.

I don't expect much to arrive this year - bonus if it does.
 

Raymond

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Bob, I didn't fully answer your question - yes, there's a rubber seal let into a groove around the inner chaincase. The outer case is plain but has a wide flat edge, at least 1/2". So sealing should be perfect.

The decompressor cable arrived today, a bloody miracle considering it's nearly Christmas and I only ordered it yesterday.

The lady I spoke to at Burton Bike Bits was so helpful. Cheerful Northern accent, 'Have you bought anything from us before, Love?' I wasn't sure but she had a look and found an account from a few years back when I was rebuilding the Triumph TR6 - gratuitous picture:

Fanny by Gary.jpg

She then asked, 'What bike do you have now, Love?' I told her 2002 Bullet 500 and she said, 'Oh dear, the part you've ordered isn't right for that bike. It's for one of the old Redditch Bullets.'

That's ok says me, the part's listed for '59 to '61 Bullet but I've fitted an old-style chrome decompressor lever and I'm told that's the cable I should use.

'Oh, right, you should be alright with that then, but if it's wrong, send it back.'

Good old-fashioned service!
 
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Raymond

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5T, Bob, the TR6 was a lovely bike and as I said somewhere one of the nicest bikes to ride I've ever had. But, when I bought it there was a bunch of things wrong with it.

Every
fastener had been butchered, frame was rusty, engine leaked oil. Most urgently, the electrics - without doubt the worst I have ever seen. The PO was a domestic electrician by trade, so no excuse - he had buggered it up with redundant wires, cobbled together with 'chocolate block' domestic wire connectors but even then it didn't charge the battery. So he wired the ammeter reversed polarity - yes, an electrician and he really did that - and had the nerve to point out to me that the bike was charging. I have no words. The first big job I did, had to, was completely re-wired it.

Tried to deal with the oil leaks. So I completely rebuild the engine, new bearings, seals, gaskets, the lot. Also, completely rebuilt the chassis. Found a guy in the next village who still does stove-enamelling instead of powder-coating. New wheel bearings, swing-arm bushes, etcetera.

But even with a rebuilt engine, it still leaked oil, just not as bad. Then a couple of times it wet-sumped. And that was a pain on a kick-start only bike.

Loved that bike and really wanted to get it right and keep it forever. Even thought about re-building the engine again.

But the end, I thought, this bike is giving me more anguish than joy, so I sold it. The buyer was a fellow member of the Lonely Ones forum - phoned me up and made an offer. He had followed the saga, knew all about the bike and was delighted to take it on.

Probably just about broke even, what I'd paid plus the thousands spent. Philosophically, I thought at least I've met lots of really good people - the stove enameller, the engineers who rebuilt the crankshaft - and the bike has taught me loads. A bitter/sweet parting.

How does it compare with an XS650? The XS is a bit more powerful, but the TR6 smoother. Lovely, creamy power delivery. The Edward Turner design was at it's best in 650 form - they were never quite a happy stretched to 750. Very nice gearchange and only four gears.

Somebody give me a chance to ride 'em back-to-back and I'll tell you more.
 

jetmechmarty

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The print on that stator box makes me cringe a little--"Trust Lucas"?! They might have changed their ways, but I have too many memories of the Bad Old Days to do that.
You had best not fly on anything Rolls-Royce powered. There's Lucas on those things!
 

Jan_P

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Wow Raymond what a beauty! That bike would go for big money these days, but I’m with 5Twins, that would’ve been a hard one to part with!

I would be interested in ca prices on Triumphs What you experienced Gentlemen consider a fair price.
Late summer I got Info on where a 1968 Bonneville is. I have been looking for exact that Machine almost 40 years
Have not seen it. Yet.
I know who the owner is Competent enthusiast ..top Competent Builder and Wiring expert.
So it is in restored .God Condition. A 7 -8 ish on a scale to 10. I would assume.
Not used much.

Should talk of numbers and price come up. Which sooner or later happens .Owner is getting older to ... it is always good to have an idea.
What ballpark on price.
 

Tinker Taylor

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She then asked, 'What bike do you have now, Love?' I told her 2002 Bullet 500 and she said, 'Oh dear, the part you've ordered isn't right for that bike. It's for one of the old Redditch Bullets.'

That's ok says me, the part's listed for '59 to '61 Bullet but I've fitted an old-style chrome decompressor lever and I'm told that's the cable I should use.

'Oh, right, you should be alright with that then, but if it's wrong, send it back.'
Wow, nothing like good, prompt service and she really knew something about her line of business. She deserves a Christmas Card, Raymond!
'TT'
 

Jim

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The print on that stator box makes me cringe a little--"Trust Lucas"?! They might have changed their ways, but I have too many memories of the Bad Old Days to do that.
You had best not fly on anything Rolls-Royce powered. There's Lucas on those things!
In my mind I always envisioned the Lucas design campus consisting of 2 large buildings.
The first is staffed with proper engineers (bean counters disallowed) who design proper systems and components for aircraft.
The second is staffed with engineering school graduates, janitors and half arsed mechanics. Management is staffed entirely of bean counters. That's the division that designs auto and bike systems.
There's a 20ft tall twin electrified fence (designed by General Electric) with a guard dog run in it.... separating the two buildings.
 

jetmechmarty

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In my mind I always envisioned the Lucas design campus consisting of 2 large buildings.
The first is staffed with proper engineers (bean counters disallowed) who design proper systems and components for aircraft.
The second is staffed with engineering school graduates, janitors and half arsed mechanics. Management is staffed entirely of bean counters. That's the division that designs auto and bike systems.
There's a 20ft tall twin electrified fence (designed by General Electric) with a guard dog run in it.... separating the two buildings.
That’s funny right there!
 

grizld1

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Re. Triumph 4 speed, oil-in-tank 650 vs. Yamaha 650, there were tradeoffs both ways. The 74-forward Yamahas are heavier than a 4-speed Bonneville by 50 to 100 lbs., depending on year, and a lot of that heft sits up high, resulting in top-heavy steering. The Triumph's pushrod motor has less topside weight. Better balance, better dampers, and better frame design give the Triumph much better handling--quicker, more linear steering and less deflection in bumpy corners. As to power, the Bonneville delivered approximately the same peak power as the XS650, but at lower rpm. I cruised my '68 Bonnie at 80 mph frequently and could turn up the wick to 115 at will. The bottom line was that you could buy British and get a rider's machine at the price of much maintenance, or buy Japanese and get a reliable machine and either tolerate its rotten handling or spend significant bucks correcting its bad manners. If you wanted something that could dance with the Brits, the final price of the Yamaha was higher. Back in the day the connoisseur's ride of choice was the 500 cc. Triumph Daytona--superb handling, think the line and the bike was on it. Sadly, that fine handling was a bit too confidence inspiring. Bob Dylan's near-fatal crash was aboard a Daytona, and John Gardner, novelist, critic, and scholar, died on one.
 

Raymond

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I'd agree with Grizld on every point of that comparison. Except of course, I never pushed the 1970 TR6 anywhere near those kinds of speeds.

Yesterday, took the decompressor off the Enfield - changing the cable is a fiddle, so that makes it a bit easier. It screws out from the cylinder head a bit like a spark plug. There's supposed to be three washers on the decompressor - steel one plus one large and one smaller copper sealing washers. This is what I found:

PICT2778.JPG

Weekend furlough? The smaller copper washer gone AWOL, the large one been in a barroom brawl.

Never seen a washer distorted quite like that. I fink maybe somebody managed to get is squiffy then went ahead and tightened down anyway. Set of three on order . . .
 

grizld1

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115 would have been a bit out of the range of the TR6 and an 80 mph cruise would have stressed it. The Trophy wasn't as highly tuned as the Bonnie and was geared lower as well. Stock top gear ratio on the XS650 fell right between the Trophy and the Bonneville.
 
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