About that popcorn machine...

Downeaster

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Not knowing anything about how those sequential lights worked but if it is of the age some of the ones I recall on movie house here I would guess that they are more mechanical than electronic controlled.

I'm picturing a rotary switch hooked to a speed reducer.
My first thought was a bank of relays, but a rotary switch would work too.
 

xjwmx

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The relays would make the heavy-duty parts off the shelf parts, and then the complicated part, the rotary switch, could be low voltage and light duty. Instead of a rotary it could use an electronic dealie called a shift register, either hardware or microprocessor

40 yrs ago I worked briefly for a sign-maker. He said there are industrial light bulbs used in signs that last much longer than household ones, so they don't have to change bulbs constantly. I think one of the great unheralded achievements of the 21st century is you don't have to buy light bulbs anymore. Short life of light bulbs was contrived by consortium of manufacturers, something well-documented. Probably could not continue in this information age. Maybe they realized the jig was up.
 

Grimly

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40 yrs ago I worked briefly for a sign-maker. He said there are industrial light bulbs used in signs that last much longer than household ones, so they don't have to change bulbs constantly. I think one of the great unheralded achievements of the 21st century is you don't have to buy light bulbs anymore. Short life of light bulbs was contrived by consortium of manufacturers, something well-documented. Probably could not continue in this information age. Maybe they realized the jig was up.
Industrial rough service bulbs were a commonly available item at electrical wholesalers, for use in inspection handlamps. They really did survive a long time in conditions of being dropped and banged often.
Not so sure about the much-touted longevity of modern bulbs. Ignoring the cheap ones, which peg out quicker, most LED bulbs aren't lasting as long as the makers claim, from what I see. 50,000 hours is a lot of hokum.
 

Mikey

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I've bought a bunch of LEDs and mind they were selling them cheap but putting one in a bathroom or table lamp they might last 6-8 months
Pure garbage
 

gggGary

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I'm almost all LED now, replaced the CFL's (THEY were mostly short lived) as they died.
So far so good on longevity.
Instant start in extreme cold a big benefit over the CFL's, that were real pokey about getting bright in the cold.
 

Jim

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Forgot about the CFL's. Was an early converter to them too.... which explains why they're all gone now. :banghead:
Early to the LED bandwagon.
I suppose that when the matter/anti-matter bulbs hit the market I'll be the first on them too.
I'm such a gullible little bastard.... :cautious:
 

willis

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I feel It’s only a matter of time before they stop producing incandescent bulbs. The government will probably outlaw them for their inefficiency :shrug:
 
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