Alice left us today.

toglhot

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Alice left us at 4:30 this afternoon. She went peacefully cradled in our arms. Alice had been sick for a few weeks: Cushing’s, pancreas problems, enlarged liver, stomach ulcers and other masses on her internal organs. We she woke this morning she was very, very sick, so, we rushed her to the Vet. The Vet did an ultrasound this afternoon and gave us the news she had pancreatic cancer and only about six weeks to live.

The Vet clinic invited us down this afternoon to say our final goodbyes and hold her as she passed.

Alice adopted us 7 years ago when she was 5. A very timid dog and very much afraid of the world. When we picked her up she was terrified of us and wanted nothing to do with us, Once we got her home she was our little girl, all 6kgs of her.

She shared our life, sleeping in the bed, watching TV with us at night, sitting on our laps or next to us on the sofa and following her mum around all day. Our house, and us, were her world, she got extremely stressed when we took her for walks, so, we stopped walking her. Just the sight of other people, dogs, unfamiliar places terrified her. At home she was a different dog, just content to be with us: House, car, caravan, or her little bike trailer, as long as she was with us she was happy. If we went out without her, she’d sit next to the roll a door waiting for us to come home, refusing to eat, drink or sleep.

Alice lost her sight 12 months ago, and her hearing not long after, but still she liked to play with her green stick, her security blanket that came with her. Whenever she was stressed, she’d pick up her green stick and hold it in her mouth. In the mornings she’d bring her stick into the bedroom while we brushed our teeth. Then I’d kick her stick and she’d fetch it. After she lost her sight, she still liked to chase her green stick, using her hearing and smell to locate it. When she lost her hearing, she went off the loud sound it made when it hit the hall wall. At night she’d sometimes get frisky, grab her ball and fling it up in the air.

Being a RAAF police dog handler for 25 years I saw dozens of dogs euthanised, each one worse than the last.

Alice will be cremated and her ashes will take pride of place in the bookcase, next to Dennis and Toby.

We are devastated!

RIP little girl, no more toothaches, no more being scared, no more Vet visits, your spirit will always. be with us .

A dog will give you some of the best days of your life, and one of the worst.
 

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Blessings upon her spirit. For perhaps 30,000 years, for millennia very few people have slept without a dog nearby. We share the same breath. Some say, and I agree, that we would not be humans if there had not been dogs.
 
We also have a little "shrine" in our bedroom... 5 boxes at last count. Holding one of 'em while they take their last breath is one of the hardest things we'll ever do. Yet, after a lifetime of loyalty and joy, how could you not?
I feel for ya... you and your missus.
And as you already know, a day will come when you both talk of her and have a little chuckle at how silly something was that she did.
Not today though...
 
Alice left us at 4:30 this afternoon. She went peacefully cradled in our arms. Alice had been sick for a few weeks: Cushing’s, pancreas problems, enlarged liver, stomach ulcers and other masses on her internal organs. We she woke this morning she was very, very sick, so, we rushed her to the Vet. The Vet did an ultrasound this afternoon and gave us the news she had pancreatic cancer and only about six weeks to live.

The Vet clinic invited us down this afternoon to say our final goodbyes and hold her as she passed.

Alice adopted us 7 years ago when she was 5. A very timid dog and very much afraid of the world. When we picked her up she was terrified of us and wanted nothing to do with us, Once we got her home she was our little girl, all 6kgs of her.

She shared our life, sleeping in the bed, watching TV with us at night, sitting on our laps or next to us on the sofa and following her mum around all day. Our house, and us, were her world, she got extremely stressed when we took her for walks, so, we stopped walking her. Just the sight of other people, dogs, unfamiliar places terrified her. At home she was a different dog, just content to be with us: House, car, caravan, or her little bike trailer, as long as she was with us she was happy. If we went out without her, she’d sit next to the roll a door waiting for us to come home, refusing to eat, drink or sleep.

Alice lost her sight 12 months ago, and her hearing not long after, but still she liked to play with her green stick, her security blanket that came with her. Whenever she was stressed, she’d pick up her green stick and hold it in her mouth. In the mornings she’d bring her stick into the bedroom while we brushed our teeth. Then I’d kick her stick and she’d fetch it. After she lost her sight, she still liked to chase her green stick, using her hearing and smell to locate it. When she lost her hearing, she went off the loud sound it made when it hit the hall wall. At night she’d sometimes get frisky, grab her ball and fling it up in the air.

Being a RAAF police dog handler for 25 years I saw dozens of dogs euthanised, each one worse than the last.

Alice will be cremated and her ashes will take pride of place in the bookcase, next to Dennis and Toby.

We are devastated!

RIP little girl, no more toothaches, no more being scared, no more Vet visits, your spirit will always. be with us .

A dog will give you some of the best days of your life, and one of the worst.
Sorry to hear about that TH.
Its tough losing any animal that’s part of the family.
 
My favorite saying - strive to be the person your dog thinks you are.
Know how you feel right now . You gave her a beautiful life
 
Dogs are so much like humans, it does hurt to see them go. I've had collies through most of my life. The first one was my mother, another one was my protector, one was just my best friend, the current one is probably the smartest and most difficult, she's my baby girl. My protector knew that she was going to pass, she showed us in her last two weeks that she could out-communicate, out-play and out-love the younger dog. I owe her a lot, she was fearless against big trucks, coyotes, weasels and had the best sense of humor, this dog could laugh. I miss them all, but I miss Dixie the most.

Condolences, Scott
 
I feel your pain. My condolences of your loss.
Vickie and I lost our 3 dogs last year. Each one has a story. We have their ashes on a shelf.
 
I am sorry for your loss nothing connects so totally as a good dog.

About a week ago my middle girl showed me where she scattered her mother's ashes,, which in a flash of brilliance she had mixed with eco friendly glitter,.
It was on the high moors where the wind always blows.

As a man who plans to start procrastinating tomorrow I scattered the ashes of Peaches, my wife's Malemute, who died 10 days before. I took the opportunity to also scatter the ashes of Bella, the best Pit Bull I ever met, and Rocky's, a brain damaged gay Staffordshire Bull Terrier, who filled Bella's need to mother for 8 years.

Point being Alex did not tell me that the wind always swirls at the spot she picked so the whole process turned into a farce as I upended the first box and disappeared in a cloud of dog dust,, by the time I had emptied all three containers I looked liked I had been dug up, she was ok because she had put some distance between us.

We went to the nearest pub, The Tan Hill Inn, the highest pub in England at 1,732 ft., to wash myself off. Turned out the toilet had only a tiny corner sink, wash hand basin, so I did my best but just turned myself into a dirty streaky weirdo by the time I stopped because I was making the tile floor slippery with only an air dryer or cheap tissue to dry myself

Nobody sat near us all through our lunch, maybe because we were laughing.
When I set out I did not expect that day to make me laugh so hard and so long.
 
I am sorry for your loss nothing connects so totally as a good dog.

About a week ago my middle girl showed me where she scattered her mother's ashes,, which in a flash of brilliance she had mixed with eco friendly glitter,.
It was on the high moors where the wind always blows.

As a man who plans to start procrastinating tomorrow I scattered the ashes of Peaches, my wife's Malemute, who died 10 days before. I took the opportunity to also scatter the ashes of Bella, the best Pit Bull I ever met, and Rocky's, a brain damaged gay Staffordshire Bull Terrier, who filled Bella's need to mother for 8 years.

Point being Alex did not tell me that the wind always swirls at the spot she picked so the whole process turned into a farce as I upended the first box and disappeared in a cloud of dog dust,, by the time I had emptied all three containers I looked liked I had been dug up, she was ok because she had put some distance between us.

We went to the nearest pub, The Tan Hill Inn, the highest pub in England at 1,732 ft., to wash myself off. Turned out the toilet had only a tiny corner sink, wash hand basin, so I did my best but just turned myself into a dirty streaky weirdo by the time I stopped because I was making the tile floor slippery with only an air dryer or cheap tissue to dry myself

Nobody sat near us all through our lunch, maybe because we were laughing.
When I set out I did not expect that day to make me laugh so hard and so long.
A lot of sadness because of the loss but a day you and your daughter will never forget :)
 
We've been looking for a dog since Alice left us, we only want a small dog, but they are as rare as hen's teeth, cannot find one.
When covid hit everyone was trapped at home, so, everyone raced out and got a dog. Now that covid isn't such a big thing, everyone has returned to work and surrendered their dogs to the pound or the shelters and they are chockers.
Unfortunately, everyone wants 'tough' dog, you know pit bulls with studded collars and all that sort of crap. Going through the list of dogs in shelters it is so sad to see so many sad faces, dogs are good at showing their sad side.
Unfortunately, we don't have the room for a large dog, or the ability to exercise it, so we can't adopt one.
Why are people so damn cruel.
 
I have almost the same plan as you, soon as the summer is over I will be looking for a puppy who will be bike portable next year, planning on getting some done while the sun shines this year.
I am not a Chihuahua kind of guy so I think a Rough Jack Russel bitch will be first choice but like anybody else who loves dogs I may connect with another breed or even a mongrel.
With me its character not breed that matters, dogs or people.
Good luck on your search.
 
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