DIY Solid State Power Distributor Box

350GUY

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Howdy everyone - Calling all the electrical Guru's out here. There are many centralized power distribution units available, but all are out of my reach $$. I plan on installing Auxiliary Fog lights, dual horns, GPS, LED headlight, and various other gadgets as I am thinking of doing a long interstate road trip for a week or so. I plan on building my own Fuse + Solid State relay power distribution box. The 6-blade fuse box & 50AMP solid state relay is available on eBay, for cheap. So here's my question based on the below mock-up diagram. Is it possible to run all of them gadgets, fog lights etc. off one 50Amp Solid State DC relay? Can I turn on the powerful fog lamps, run my GPS, work the horn, heated grips etc. all at the same time, off the single 50AMP solid state relay, as pictured in the diagram below? Does the below wiring diagram make sense?

Looking forward to your guidance. Thanks in advance.

1720615889304.png
 
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Maybe I am not awake yet
But does not look right to me
The Keysolu has an Input side an an Output side LOAD
There is nothing connected to the LOAD
And it is labelled 100 A 30 V AC ? Alternating current ?? ???

The alternator on XS 650 is not so powerful it might not be able to handle extra Loads
 
Not a Guru but will have a lash at it.
First thing to do is work out a power budget (do a maximum demand calculation)
What loads do you have in watts then convert to amps.

Some loads will be 100% duty ie when running they draw the same current all the time they are switched on. Lights being the main one.
Other loads heated grips and liner may cycle as the thermostat switches on and off or may run at 100% if no thermostat fitted ie the load factor.
I would ignore loads that are very intermittent for example the Horn.
How often will you run with the fog lights?
Once you have a number in Amps or Watts this is your maximum demand.

Now you have a number in amps or watts how does this compare to the alternators output. If it is more than the alternators output you will be draining the battery.Eventually unless your bike has a self generating CDI ignition the battery will be drained so low that it will stop running.

The solid state relay you show is for AC loads the XS has a DC system, I am not sure if the relay shown will work. Your drawing has the load going through the control part of the relay (4-32VDC) not the load switching contacts.

What I suggest you do is fit an ammeter and a system of switching so that you can vary the load to keep to a level that your alternator can cope.

I hope this makes sense and has not confused you.
 
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Good morning Sir's: My bad. Had attached the wrong solid state relay for reference., Have since corrected it. The SSR will have a DC output: 30V and 50 Amps. (min 4 VDC).

I plan on running the fog lights while transiting forest areas or areas where there is no traffic and total darkness, perhaps 25 to 45 mins at a stretch? I have the Hughs CDI PMA, which I believe will charge the battery as usual. The relay that I've now posted is the exact one that I plan on buying. It has the below four terminal points that are numbered from 1 to 4. Below is exactly what is on the SSR I plan on buying. I've added another picture of the same product from another vendor.

50A 30VDC
Load= - 1
Load= 2 +

INPUT 4 - 32VDC

Load= - 4
Load= 4 +

1720616862499.png

 
Team: Also, my idea stemmed from the below concept, except that his has the SSR on one board.
I just plan on buying the 6 blade fuse box and add the 50AMP DC SSR to it, based on my diagramm. I truly appreciate all the guidance.
Have a fun and safe day ahead.
1720617345673.png
 
350Guy - I am running a similar layout to your plan. Its not as sofisticated but its simple and along the same lines.
Refer the picture: (the battery is missing in the shot)
The relay is triggered by the ignition switch - thats its whole job.
The high current path that is then switched (through the relay) to the fuse box is a short run direct from the battery with no voltage drop and its own fuse.
The individual circuits are then fed via their fuse.
You could just use a larger capacity relay but keep in mind you are ultimately governed by your alternator output
Regards - Ray.
P1040296.JPG
.
 
350Guy - I am running a similar layout to your plan. Its not as sofisticated but its simple and along the same lines.
Refer the picture: (the battery is missing in the shot)
The relay is triggered by the ignition switch - thats its whole job.
The high current path that is then switched (through the relay) to the fuse box is a short run direct from the battery with no voltage drop and its own fuse.
The individual circuits are then fed via their fuse.
You could just use a larger capacity relay but keep in mind you are ultimately governed by your alternator output
Regards - Ray.
View attachment 330682.
Looks like a neat, sensible layout.

I have done partly that. Using a relay to send battery voltage directly to the ignition system for the best sparks I can get from the coils.
 
Not a Guru but will have a lash at it.
First thing to do is work out a power budget (do a maximum demand calculation)
What loads do you have in watts then convert to amps.

Some loads will be 100% duty ie when running they draw the same current all the time they are switched on. Lights being the main one.
Other loads heated grips and liner may cycle as the thermostat switches on and off or may run at 100% if no thermostat fitted ie the load factor.
I would ignore loads that are very intermittent for example the Horn.
How often will you run with the fog lights?
Once you have a number in Amps or Watts this is your maximum demand.

Now you have a number in amps or watts how does this compare to the alternators output. If it is more than the alternators output you will be draining the battery.Eventually unless your bike has a self generating CDI ignition the battery will be drained so low that it will stop running.

The solid state relay you show is for AC loads the XS has a DC system, I am not sure if the relay shown will work. Your drawing has the load going through the control part of the relay (4-32VDC) not the load switching contacts.

What I suggest you do is fit an ammeter and a system of switching so that you can vary the load to keep to a level that your alternator can cope.

I hope this makes sense and has not confused you.
Thank you Signal for your
350Guy - I am running a similar layout to your plan. Its not as sofisticated but its simple and along the same lines.
Refer the picture: (the battery is missing in the shot)
The relay is triggered by the ignition switch - thats its whole job.
The high current path that is then switched (through the relay) to the fuse box is a short run direct from the battery with no voltage drop and its own fuse.
The individual circuits are then fed via their fuse.
You could just use a larger capacity relay but keep in mind you are ultimately governed by your alternator output
Regards - Ray.
View attachment 330682.
Thank you Ray for your input.
 
Not a Guru but will have a lash at it.
First thing to do is work out a power budget (do a maximum demand calculation)
What loads do you have in watts then convert to amps.

Some loads will be 100% duty ie when running they draw the same current all the time they are switched on. Lights being the main one.
Other loads heated grips and liner may cycle as the thermostat switches on and off or may run at 100% if no thermostat fitted ie the load factor.
I would ignore loads that are very intermittent for example the Horn.
How often will you run with the fog lights?
Once you have a number in Amps or Watts this is your maximum demand.

Now you have a number in amps or watts how does this compare to the alternators output. If it is more than the alternators output you will be draining the battery.Eventually unless your bike has a self generating CDI ignition the battery will be drained so low that it will stop running.

The solid state relay you show is for AC loads the XS has a DC system, I am not sure if the relay shown will work. Your drawing has the load going through the control part of the relay (4-32VDC) not the load switching contacts.

What I suggest you do is fit an ammeter and a system of switching so that you can vary the load to keep to a level that your alternator can cope.

I hope this makes sense and has not confused you.

With all the loads possible you want a voltmeter up on the handlebar. a combo voltmeter USB port direct from battery very handy. I run one off the battery shore charge sae port I have on all my bikes
Thank you Sir. Certainly have plans for a voltmeter.
 
Not a Guru but will have a lash at it.
First thing to do is work out a power budget (do a maximum demand calculation)
What loads do you have in watts then convert to amps.

Some loads will be 100% duty ie when running they draw the same current all the time they are switched on. Lights being the main one.
Other loads heated grips and liner may cycle as the thermostat switches on and off or may run at 100% if no thermostat fitted ie the load factor.
I would ignore loads that are very intermittent for example the Horn.
How often will you run with the fog lights?
Once you have a number in Amps or Watts this is your maximum demand.

Now you have a number in amps or watts how does this compare to the alternators output. If it is more than the alternators output you will be draining the battery.Eventually unless your bike has a self generating CDI ignition the battery will be drained so low that it will stop running.

The solid state relay you show is for AC loads the XS has a DC system, I am not sure if the relay shown will work. Your drawing has the load going through the control part of the relay (4-32VDC) not the load switching contacts.

What I suggest you do is fit an ammeter and a system of switching so that you can vary the load to keep to a level that your alternator can cope.

I hope this makes sense and has not confused you.

Hi Signal - Many thanks for your detailed guidance. Correct, it is a DC system (have corrected my original post with the correct SSR). The SSR will have a DC output of 30V and 50 Amps. (min 4 VDC). Did the calculation and the total amount of Watts will be 196. The Hughs PMA total output is 200W. The RR unit will have the capability of charging the Battery. So with this in mind, would my above plan work?
 
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I completely mistook your plan in the first post. This is what I think you are planning:
A relay will control power to the fuses.
The individual loads will be switched on and off as required by their control switches.

Your plan will work fine.
You are unlikely to run all the loads at once so your charging system should cope. If you fit a voltmeter as Gary suggests if you see the voltage dropping you can switch off circuits until the voltage stabilizes.

As an aside I fit a relay to control the power to the fuses as you are planning to do. The only difference is that I use a standard Auto relay.
Enjoy your trip and don't forget to post photos.
 
I Have No experience on PMA .
But I feel that some systems dont like to be used at the top of their capacity for long times

total amount of Watts will be 196. The Hughs PMA total output is 200W.
Electronics is often killed by heat We are talking long rides at high power consumption.
Again NO experience of these .But I would look inte recommendations on margins .
and Cooling fins or so.

Manufacturers may exaggerate performance sometimes

But If I remember correct High system usage can mean the regulator dont have to cook of as much
Surplus Power. Created by Magnets and RPM
 
I Have No experience on PMA .
But I feel that some systems dont like to be used at the top of their capacity for long times

total amount of Watts will be 196. The Hughs PMA total output is 200W.
Electronics is often killed by heat We are talking long rides at high power consumption.
Again NO experience of these .But I would look inte recommendations on margins .
and Cooling fins or so.

Manufacturers may exaggerate performance sometimes

But If I remember correct High system usage can mean the regulator dont have to cook of as much
Surplus Power. Created by Magnets and RPM

Thanks Jan, appreciate the feed back and will certainly keep in mind the load factor.
 
I completely mistook your plan in the first post. This is what I think you are planning:
A relay will control power to the fuses.
The individual loads will be switched on and off as required by their control switches.

Your plan will work fine.
You are unlikely to run all the loads at once so your charging system should cope. If you fit a voltmeter as Gary suggests if you see the voltage dropping you can switch off circuits until the voltage stabilizes.

As an aside I fit a relay to control the power to the fuses as you are planning to do. The only difference is that I use a standard Auto relay.
Enjoy your trip and don't forget to post photos.

Thank you so much Sir Signal! This is exactly the guidance I was looking for.
Will definitely post them pixs. Thanks once again and have a lovely weekend.
 
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