DIY sump filter

Jusblowit

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As I'm heading down the home stretch with with my long term project (I think it's been over 5 years in the making!), I finally got to dealing with the sump filter, and came up with a rather neat solution for the task, so I'd like to share here for everyones benefit. The sump filter is one of the known shortcomings of the original machine, plenty of posts about it here and anywhere you get your 650 news, so I won't get into it here. I knew from the beginning I'd be replacing it with SOMETHING but since nothing else in the build depends on it, it got left till the end.

Outside of patching with various combinations of epoxy, sheet metal and prayers, there are several ready made solutions:

Mike's xs sell an upgraded replacement:
https://www.mikesxs.net/yamaha-xs650-oem-type-oil-filter-strainer-sump-oem-256-13411-01.html
Consensus seems to be they don't fair much better than the originals.

SmedSpeed in the UK sells a modified sump plate that will accept a modern spin on filter.
http://www.smedspeed.co.uk/sumpfilter.html
Have no experience with those but they look well made and it's a 2-for-1 as it is an upgrade from the OE gauze filter. Probably has some cooling effect too as it hangs below the sump. The downside I suppose is it will lower ground clearance somewhat. Only an issue if you're in the habit of riding stairs or jumping curbs...OR as in my case, installing 2-into-1 TT style pipes. I actually don't KNOW it won't clear those but I suspected it wouldnt so decided to go a different route .

Originally was going to go with the Heiden Tuning sump kit :
https://www.heidentuning.com/xs650-...sump-oil-filter-kit-heiden-tuning-detail.html

It's a bolt-on mod, doesn't change anything externally, and is reasonably priced. I ordered one alongside Heiden's remote filter kit , which Is a well designed and made piece of kit- I would recommend it if you're going to go the remote filter route. I upgraded mine with AN swivel fittings and braided lines:
IMG_20201223_170836_4.jpg
(Oil cooler isn't part of the Heiden kit, it's the Mike's item)
Unfortunately Heiden forgot to send it with the filter kit. I got a refund for the missing piece without issue, but since I didn't feel like shelling out for international shipping on an unplanned second package and neither Mr. Heiden, that idea got tabled.

When I finally got around to doing it I decided I liked the Heiden design, and could probably replicate something like it. The one flaw I do see with Heiden's design is the mesh filter is held on to a barb fitting by.... ??
PB020617 (Small).jpg
Unknown. An o-ring? He may have engineered something there that doesn't show in the picture, but if I had to guess, it looks like it's a friction fit. It probably could not fall clean off thanks to the tight quarters in the sump, but if I had put that in my bike I'd be constantly wondering whether it's slipped off its mooring allowing unfiltered particles into the oil pump. Not saying it would, but I would definitely be thinking about it. After all the unnecessary over engineering I've put into this build, why skimp now?

So here is my solution. It's pretty much an upgraded version of the Heiden design. I'm pretty happy with the result and I feel confident it will do its job and hold up well. It fits in the sump nicely and clears the crank with plenty headroom to spare.
*NOTE: I still have to verify with regards to oil level that the outlet opening in the end of the filter will in fact always be submerged. (If it doesn't seem like it will there are shorter elbow fittings available)

Here are the raw ingredients: (fittings available through Jeg's/Summit Racing/etc)
IMG_20210102_172538_5.jpg
Left to right-
*A piece of 1/4" aluminum plate with two M6 clearance holes spaced to match the threaded holes in the sump plate. this got a thin coat of gasket maker and attached with two low profile m6 Alen head bolts (these were necessary for the fitting to clear) The center hole sits over the oil passage in the sump plate and is drilled and tapped for 3/8" npt.

*3/8” npt male to -6an flare female, 90° swivel elbow. This one is Earl's 922166
For $25.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/ear-922166erl
I had this one kicking around but you can buy a non-swivel fitting for about half that, such as this:
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/ear-at982266erl
The non swivel fittings are also a bit shorter which will put the filter closer to the sump plate if necessary.
The npt side threads into the aluminum plate and the an side attaches to the filter.

* -6an o-ring to male flare adapter.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/VPE-16826
$7. This adapts the filter to the elbow fitting.

*Inline fuel filter, Earl's 230626. This one is a pre filter, 100 micron, and has -6an o-ring ports.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/ear-230626erl
$75. There may be cheaper options but this is the one I found that was the right size.
It needs a bit of modification for this setup. First cut off the o-ring port on the intake side. It won't be needed and needs to go for the whole thing to fit.
IMG_20210102_180219_1.jpg
*You may want to work the outlet end cap loose before you do this, as they are on there *tight* and once you make the cut there's nothing to put a wrench on.

Then I temporarily removed the guts and drilled the casing full of holes, staying far enough from the edges so as not to disturb the threads for the end caps:
IMG_20210102_182202_7.jpg
since it will live submerged in oil this should allow oil to enter from all directions. Be sure to de-burr the holes.

Lastly put everything back together, taking care to reassemble the filter element and spring in the right order (pay attention when taking apart!)
IMG_20210102_174439_7.jpg
And attach to the sump plate. Voila:
IMG_20210102_182523_1.jpg
 

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I looked at the photos and thought of a couple of problems. Then I read the text and you have addressed them. Its good to get other ways of doing things, thanks for posting.
 
... I temporarily removed the guts and drilled the casing full of holes, staying far enough from the edges so as not to disturb the threads for the end caps:

since it will live submerged in oil this should allow oil to enter from all directions. Be sure to de-burr the holes...

May I suggest having the holes at only the bottom half of the housing.

Avoids debris falling in from above.
Avoids starvation from air above the can.
Avoids frothy oil in the upper windage zone...
 


You're referring to the unit made by beags64? (is there a way to tag another member?) That is really nice. If Heiden's design seems a bit flimsy, that one seems a bit overkill.

I like the idea of using the housed filter element to shield the mesh, especially if holes are only drilled in the bottom half as you suggested. Plus it's a reliably obtainable part from a reputable parts supplier.

If I had the machinery and skills, my ideal design would be a solid block bolted over the oil passage like the other two gentlemen have done, tapped for for an NPT or o-ring port and coupled to the Earl's filter. That takes advantage of a pre made part and simplifies the machining process- just a block with bolt holes and a 90° passage tapped on one side. No need for a 2nd block on the other side
 
I am beyond 60,000 miles on my bike. All of the miles, save a very few, are mine. I have NEVER torn the filter. Long a ago, my local Yammie dealer rightfully warned me about it, and I just replaced it unnecessarily. I'm due an oil change and I'll have another look very soon.

That said, every XS650 I have drug home (probably 6 to 8 bikes) has had a torn screen.
 
I have the Smedspeed option and I am well happy

Hi, this solution is super easy to maintain, but don't combine it with a larger oil pump and driving at high altitudes. Fine filters on the suction side are not found anywhere in vehicle construction. The reason is that more or less only the atmospheric pressure ensures that the oil is pushed through the filter. At higher altitudes (especially in combination with the larger oil pump) the oil flow can break off due to the formation of bubbles.

However, there is no limit on the pressure side of the oil pump, which is why fine filters are only installed there on series engines...

Well, of course that's the theory. In practice, I haven't heard of any damage on the flatland and with timely filter changes. But under the special conditions mentioned above there were definitely some.
 
Hi, this solution is super easy to maintain, but don't combine it with a larger oil pump and driving at high altitudes. Fine filters on the suction side are not found anywhere in vehicle construction. The reason is that more or less only the atmospheric pressure ensures that the oil is pushed through the filter. At higher altitudes (especially in combination with the larger oil pump) the oil flow can break off due to the formation of bubbles.

However, there is no limit on the pressure side of the oil pump, which is why fine filters are only installed there on series engines...

Well, of course that's the theory. In practice, I haven't heard of any damage on the flatland and with timely filter changes. But under the special conditions mentioned above there were definitely some.
Agreed.
 
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