Electric Vehicles, Hybrids...Battery tech... Land Air and Sea. Let's See 'em.

Is the internal combustion engine doomed to history

  • Yes

    Votes: 10 25.6%
  • No

    Votes: 21 53.8%
  • Not sure

    Votes: 5 12.8%
  • Don't care

    Votes: 2 5.1%
  • ...er... what was the question again?

    Votes: 1 2.6%

  • Total voters
    39
I haven't watched the video, but I assume it's to do with battery life and cost. Our govt is also pushing for EVs, problem is, battery technology is not up to scratch yet and EVs are pretty darn expensive. Then there's range. Not for me, not until they come up with something better than lithium batteries.

There was a recent comp between two BMWs, one electric and one petrol. The route was Sydney to Melbourne from memory. The petrol BMW won, cheaper and a lot quicker. The EV BMW got bogged down with charging time and charging costs on the way. The costs associated with charging stations was more than the petrol cost.

I think the green credentials of EVs go out the window when you consider how that electricity is generated to charge them, the problems associated with disposing of the batteries at the end of their life and the cost to the environment producing batteries. Then there's the environmental cost of producing the remainder of the car, it is the same as a petrol engined car.

I personally think they have chased the cat up the wrong tree. Fuel cell technology makes more sense to me.

We'll probably run out of fossil fuels before they find a way forward. Currently hydrogen appears a better solution, but infrastructure and cost of production are the main sticking points. The Chinese are working on ammonia as a fuel.
The video is more about real life ownership and the resale / trade in value of an EV after about three years. Trade in value droped from £120,000 purchase price to low £40,000 as a trade in (which the dealer didnt want to do due to overstock on used EV cars!). He does mention replacement battery cost due to degradation issues. The offers to buy from online dealers such as We Buy Any Car were as low as £28,000! Its seems electric car ownership is a real downward worm hole long term.

I agree with you that fuel cell options / synthetic fuels are the way to go.
The Goodwood revival races for 2024 are deemed to run on synthetic fuels for all classes...:yikes:
 
EVs aren't the only vehicles that suffer these problems. I saw post quite a while ago about a guy who bought an Audi, can't remember the model, but it was somewhere around $140,000. Two,years later he was offered something like $40,000 as a trade in.
 
For over 60 years I generally drove a car that cost less the umbrellas in that car
I suppose I could have bought the umbrellas first as kind on incentive to save up for the rest of the car
 
I saw a Tesla Cybertruck parked outside of a Walmart today…..I should’ve stopped to snap a photo, they sure are an odd duck. 🤔
IMG_7056.jpeg

When they were first introduced, this was the promise.
IMG_7058.jpeg

Now it’s…..
IMG_7057.jpeg


And here is the reality, if you can find one, the dealerships are gouging you.
IMG_7059.jpeg
 
I saw a Tesla Cybertruck parked outside of a Walmart today…..I should’ve stopped to snap a photo, they sure are an odd duck. 🤔
View attachment 327200

When they were first introduced, this was the promise.
View attachment 327202

Now it’s…..View attachment 327201

And here is the reality, if you can find one, the dealerships are gouging you.
View attachment 327203
According to Tyler (Hoovies - YouTube) who owns a Cyber Truck build quality is worse than a Delorean; and they were really shite!
 
According to Tyler (Hoovies - YouTube) who owns a Cyber Truck build quality is worse than a Delorean; and they were really shite!
There's one thing, the Renault V6 was a half-decent lump in its other applications, but was a pile of crap in the DMC, for some reason.
 
Consumers are less likely than they were a year ago to consider buying an EV for their next vehicle, according to a pair of new surveys.


New-vehicle buyer consideration for fully electric vehicles fell from the previous year for the first time since the start of J.D. Power’s US Electric Vehicle Consideration Survey in 2021.


According to the 2024 results, 24% of respondents are “very likely” to consider buying an EV, compared to 26% a year ago. And 58% of respondents said they are “overall likely” to consider one, down from 61%.


The results reflect “persistent growing pains” in the EV market, according to J.D. Power. They’re the latest sign that nagging concerns about affordability, a lack of new models on the market, and battery range are holding back EV adoption.


Stewart Stropp, executive director of EV intelligence at J.D. Power, noted in a press release that some 40% of car shoppers said they don’t have a “solid understanding” of incentives available for EV purchases: “Prioritizing initiatives and efforts to educate consumers about the EV proposition—including available incentives and how they work—is vital to accelerating market growth.”


Just as surging gas prices during the 1970s provided Japanese carmakers with an opportunity, Japan Inc. is ready to capitalize on the greatest fear on American roads today: running out of charge.
Toyota, Mazda, and Subaru are forging a new path in the fledgling era of all-electric vehicles. On Tuesday, the three automakers revealed prototypes of smaller combustion engines that will work in tandem with battery-powered engines and can run on standard gasoline as well as hydrogen and a variety of other fuels.
You Can Go Your Own Way
Many manufacturers had plans for all-electric lineups in the next decade or so, but most have scaled down those ambitions as EVs struggle with low adoption rates. Toyota’s Prius helped popularize hybrid cars, sales of which have become a real boon for the Japanese automaker. And now, instead of trying to take a page out of Tesla or BYD’s book, the company is looking to evolve its hybrid design toward a carbon-neutral future:
Toyota announced Monday it was partnering with petroleum companies Idemitsu Kosan, Eneos, and Mitsubishi to develop carbon-neutral fuels and make them available in Japan by 2030. Biofuels can be considered carbon-neutral as they release fewer emissions than gasoline, and the CO2 they set off could be absorbed by the plants (corn, soybeans, sugarcane) that produce the fuel.
During a presentation Tuesday, Subaru CEO Atsushi Osaki said the companies are committed to “preserving the Earth’s precious environment for future generations.” However, the auto industry must make “steady, realistic progress toward carbon neutrality” and that it’s “ultimately up to customers to decide what car is best for them.”
Bufford Barr, COO of New Day Hydrogen, sees passenger cars as part of building the clean hydrogen market, but he knows it will take a while.
“The problem with passenger vehicles is just getting enough of them on the market and that they’re using enough hydrogen to justify the stations,” he told The Daily Upside. “If you have three fueling stations in the entire state of Colorado, is that enough for you as a private vehicle owner to feel comfortable with? The answer is probably no. But for commercial fleets that have the same routes day-in-and-day-out, those three stations can give plenty of coverage.”
Electric Boogaloo: This isn’t to say Toyota has checked out of the EV game. Sure, the company hasn’t been an EV juggernaut, having only one model and opposing tailpipe emission requirements proposed by the Biden administration last year, but it sees some writing on the wall. Toyota’s Chief Technology Officer Hiroki Nakajima told the Financial Times that the company’s investment into the new engines would be a “magnitude smaller” than the money going toward electric vehicles and battery development. EV sales, while slow, are still going up. By 2030, one out of every four new passenger cars sold will be an EV, according to S&P Global, so it wouldn’t be the wisest move to ditch the solely battery-powered vehicles altogether.
Written by Griffin Kelly
 
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almost all cars depreciate rapidly and somewhat predictably. the porsche taycan wasn’t designed after a perennial classic like the 911, so it was bound to do the same. these youtubers need a dose of reality and should probably step outside their content bubble every once in a while.

this is especially true of non-collectible “luxury” cars like Audi and BMW. Look at prices on 5+ year old Q5s or 3 series BMW - they fall off a cliff when you get close to the warranty expiration date.

if porsche made an electric or hybrid 911, I’d guess they’d not suffer the same fate - but who knows!

I bought my 2016 ford edge sport in feb 2020 with 8k miles on it as a one-owner lease return for 27k, and it had a 100k ford certified pre-owned warranty with it. list price originally was north of 53k, so I for one am glad for the depreciation phenomenon. great car.
 
almost all cars depreciate rapidly and somewhat predictably. the porsche taycan wasn’t designed after a perennial classic like the 911, so it was bound to do the same. these youtubers need a dose of reality and should probably step outside their content bubble every once in a while.

this is especially true of non-collectible “luxury” cars like Audi and BMW. Look at prices on 5+ year old Q5s or 3 series BMW - they fall off a cliff when you get close to the warranty expiration date.

if porsche made an electric or hybrid 911, I’d guess they’d not suffer the same fate - but who knows!

I bought my 2016 ford edge sport in feb 2020 with 8k miles on it as a one-owner lease return for 27k, and it had a 100k ford certified pre-owned warranty with it. list price originally was north of 53k, so I for one am glad for the depreciation phenomenon. great car.
To be fair to the presenter, he did compare like for like vehicles of Electric V's Petrol / Diesel cars of the same model / milage / year.
In every case the electric variant was worth way less at trade in than the 'normal' option.
 
To be fair to the presenter, he did compare like for like vehicles of Electric V's Petrol / Diesel cars of the same model / milage / year.
In every case the electric variant was worth way less at trade in than the 'normal' option.
People are running scared of the ridiculous battery replacement costs, which amortised over the expected life of the vehicle probably account for the drop.
You buy a petrol or diesel car, you can't be exactly sure how long it will last, but there's a high probability of it surviving just fine for a reasonable time - long enough to take a gamble on it, and live with a steadily depreciating lump on the driveway, same as it ever was.
Batteries - not so much. If the shockingly high battery prices were much lower, there wouldn't be anything like the same resistance to purchase.
Still, they'll find their own level - if you can't shift it off the lot, drop the price.
 
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