Home market tx650 going to SOIR

gggGary

If not now, When?
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A 73 hiding in a garage got mentioned on an XS650 FB group when someone in Virginia was looking for a bike to buy, did some snooping, found out the guy who mentioned it lived 100 miles from me, and, well, y'all know what I mean? It's like it was meant to be. ;^)

Present owner for 50 years with a couple detours to his sons.
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He bought it from a service man (Gavinski) who'd been in Japan, had it shipped home and never rode it.
Said it last ran 5 years ago S Carolina plate dated 2017, SC title in his son's name, governor, Nicki Haley.

Gomer, with the prize snug in the van.
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On the way home now.
 
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Got it out of the van SWMBO gave it the inspection. She's OK with it, me not as much. LOL
Not much corrosion. Chrome'll never be perfect but plenty good for a bike to be ridden. Only dents I saw were two small ones in the tank.
Whole exhaust looks aftermarket, center stand and steering damper knob, shaft are missing. Had to add a bit of brake fluid but quickly got hard lever (helps backing it down a steep narrow ramp by myself!)
failed tank liner, rubbery and coming off in sheets.
Original tank no evidence of rear seam repair.
Clutch was stuck but 10 good back n forths in gear with the clutch lever adjusted for max cable pull broke it loose.
Goes through all the gears, shift lever is fairly bent.

rear tank seam
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under seat
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Side covers, don't look "extended" both sitting close to the frame.
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haven't looked yet, can you see the date?
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recovered seat on original pan. throttles are free haven't checked slides yet.
Foot guesses 70 and 100 for compression. Should be good enough to start it after a top end lube drill.
plate is 2017 so might be able to ride on the tires for a bit.
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Well that's it for tonight.
CB900 F has acetone in the gas tank overnight and valve cover off to check set valve shims.
 
Great score Gary. We are jealous.

About this whole possible serviceman's bike scenario. Coincidentally, just last night I was thinking about something related, a thing that I haven't thought about in decades. Allow me to ramble.

I did a 4-year US Navy enlistment, and from 1980 to 1983 I was stationed in San Diego. I was billeted on two different tin cans -- torpedo bait -- small disposable ships. The first was a Destroyer, DD 743, a ship that was built in 1944, while the U.S. was still at war with Germany and Japan. When I joined the crew in 1980, it was one of the oldest operating ships in the Navy. So old, that it was a Reserve ship -- I was active duty, but the ship itself was used for training weekend warrior Reservists. A year later, we decommissioned it. That was some of the sweetest Duty in the Navy. But I digress.

My second tin can was a Frigate, FF 1041. This was a legit, active ship, and legit, active ships stationed on the west coast make periodic WestPac (Western Pacific) cruises, lasting 6-9 months, and hitting places like Hawaii, Guam, Korea, Okinawa, Hong Kong, The Philippines... and Japan. I was fortunate to make 1-1/2 WestPacs -- 1/2 because I was in the Phillipines, on my second WestPac, when my enlistment was up, so I got flown back to San Diego rather than sailing back.

Anyways... You knew I was going somewhere with this, right? Sooner or later on a WestPac, you'd hit Yokosuka, Japan, home of the largest overseas US Naval Base in the world. (A perk of winning a war with an unconditional surrender.) On the Yokosuka base, Japanese auto and car makers had sales offices. Honda motorcycles for sure, probably also Yamaha and Suzuki, maybe Kawasaki, and for autos, probably Honda, Toyota, and Nissan. The deal, at the time, was that your ship's captain allowing, you could buy an auto or car on the Yokosuka base, at Japanese prices, and have it loaded on your ship. There was some kind of Duty-Free loophole, meaning that sailors didn't have to pay import fees, so all told, the savings were substantial.

The little ship I was on had no room for cars, but a couple or so of my Shipmates (out of a crew of about 250) did buy new motorcycles. These were crated. When you got back to San Diego, you would haul your crated bike to the Honda (or whatever brand) dealership, and they would assemble it for you for a fee.

The big ships, like LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank), and LSDs (Landing Ship, Dock), had big holds, and big crews, and could carry cars. When one of them returned to San Diego from WestPac, you'd see the cranes unloading dozens and dozens of new cars and crated motorcycles.
 
Great score Gary. We are jealous.

About this whole possible serviceman's bike scenario. Coincidentally, just last night I was thinking about something related, a thing that I haven't thought about in decades. Allow me to ramble.

I did a 4-year US Navy enlistment, and from 1980 to 1983 I was stationed in San Diego. I was billeted on two different tin cans -- torpedo bait -- small disposable ships. The first was a Destroyer, DD 743, a ship that was built in 1944, while the U.S. was still at war with Germany and Japan. When I joined the crew in 1980, it was one of the oldest operating ships in the Navy. So old, that it was a Reserve ship -- I was active duty, but the ship itself was used for training weekend warrior Reservists. A year later, we decommissioned it. That was some of the sweetest Duty in the Navy. But I digress.

My second tin can was a Frigate, FF 1041. This was a legit, active ship, and legit, active ships stationed on the west coast make periodic WestPac (Western Pacific) cruises, lasting 6-9 months, and hitting places like Hawaii, Guam, Korea, Okinawa, Hong Kong, The Philippines... and Japan. I was fortunate to make 1-1/2 WestPacs -- 1/2 because I was in the Phillipines, on my second WestPac, when my enlistment was up, so I got flown back to San Diego rather than sailing back.

Anyways... You knew I was going somewhere with this, right? Sooner or later on a WestPac, you'd hit Yokosuka, Japan, home of the largest overseas US Naval Base in the world. (A perk of winning a war with an unconditional surrender.) On the Yokosuka base, Japanese auto and car makers had sales offices. Honda motorcycles for sure, probably also Yamaha and Suzuki, maybe Kawasaki, and for autos, probably Honda, Toyota, and Nissan. The deal, at the time, was that your ship's captain allowing, you could buy an auto or car on the Yokosuka base, at Japanese prices, and have it loaded on your ship. There was some kind of Duty-Free loophole, meaning that sailors didn't have to pay import fees, so all told, the savings were substantial.

The little ship I was on had no room for cars, but a couple or so of my Shipmates (out of a crew of about 250) did buy new motorcycles. These were crated. When you got back to San Diego, you would haul your crated bike to the Honda (or whatever brand) dealership, and they would assemble it for you for a fee.

The big ships, like LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank), and LSDs (Landing Ship, Dock), had big holds, and big crews, and could carry cars. When one of them returned to San Diego from WestPac, you'd see the cranes unloading dozens and dozens of new cars and crated motorcycles.
Great info DB!
So while purchased in Japan, likely it was a "North American market" model.
Didn't know that about the bikes actually going home on US war ships, cool.
The vin seems to fit in the range for a US market 73 model, frame, motor match, 5000 bikes after the first 73 number and a 10/72 build date it's about mid 73 annual/model production?
73 IDs.jpg
VIN.jpg

headlight bucket fittings look like they would have held turn signals at some point.
headlight.jpg
 
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Gary, sorry for the squid hijack.DB I was also on an older ship at that time. U.S.S. Norton sound. AVM-1. Also built in 1944 it was primarily a sea-plane tender with a crew of around 1100 but recommissioned in the 70’s as a missle test platform with a crew of about 400. We tested experimental weapons systems and were responsible for working out the bugs before anything hit the fleet. Primarily at the time was the Aegis system and the vertical launch system. When we sailed to the shipyards in Pascagoula for a retrofit the captain allowed some of the crew to bring our vehicles. I believe the copter pad on the fantail held about 40 vehicles. LSS one of my claims is I had a 1956 Chevy pickup that sailed through the Panama Canal. We were also one of the first two ships to have women onboard as crew members. Those stories would take up a whole thread. lol Hijack over…..
 
Always room for wandering in my threads!
Today was mostly set bucket over shim valves in the Honda day. little more touch up and cleaning done
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Got r done and tank is ready for gas so might be able to road test it tomorrow.
Then spent a couple hours cleaning and seeing wut I drug home yesterday.
One side is scrubbed up
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I'll be darned it's' an old XS!
Not bad, not a museum worthy wonder either. It'll clean up into a decent daily rider depending on how much in parts I'm willing to toss it's way. Will see if I can lube the top end and start kicking it through a bunch tomorrow and do a first round of cleaning on the other side while looking for need to do's
Simple tool tip; when using feelers, select the ones you'll be using, wrap some tape to keep the rest out of the fray, and keep the ones you are using from sneaking back into the stack.
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Great info DB!
So while purchased in Japan, likely it was a "North American market" model.
Didn't know that about the bikes actually going home on US war ships, cool.
The vin seems to fit in the range for a US market 73 model, frame, motor match, 5000 bikes after the first 73 number and a 10/72 build date it's about mid 73 annual/model production?
View attachment 326638View attachment 326639
headlight bucket fittings look like they would have held turn signals at some point.
View attachment 326640

From what I understand about the early 70-73's is the #'s were world wide. (Europe never got a 70 XS1) That changed in 75. (Europe never got the 74), when different countries got different #'s or codes, like in 79/80 Oceania and Canada shared the same #, with a different code, 3W6, 3U6. There seems to b some sort of crossover on 73, (476), but have never seen any real confirmation. Have doughts Canada got a different # 73???
 
What’s up with that brake line Gary?
Nothing really, the brake works, but of course, needs a bunch of parts before regular duty. sometime back there was a discussion about the small tab at the top of the right ear on some early bikes. was just documenting one.
 
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