I had to do a comparison.

toglhot

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I made a billet adjuster today. I think I prefer the billet one over the sheet aluminium one.
 

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RC4MAN

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Actually there's very little load on them and once the axle is tightened all surfaces are clamped rigidly. I've never seen a chain adjuster fail except the cheap stamped end plate type that the Brits were so fond of. And that wasn't the side plates.
I personally like the like the strap configuration better as the screw threads for adjustment are in what appears to be a stainless rod rather than aluminum which is more wear prone.
Either are visually more appealing than rusted chromed steel items and I commend Toglhot on his efforts and creativity
 

toglhot

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Hmmm, that's interesting. But, I shouldn't have a problem there: The original adjuster are made from 2mm thick steel with a 2mm thick washer spot welded on the wheel side, so that's 6mm all up. The billet adjusters I made are around 5mm thick each side, so that's 10mm. I also intend on adding washers so the nut doesn't rip into the aluminium adjusters. I have to turn a few mm off each spacer to account for the thicker material in the adjusters, so I'll keep that in mind when tightening the axle nut.
 

Wingedwheel

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Just curious but would there be any type of “stretch” in those aluminum adjuster threads?
 

toglhot

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There is stretch in all materials, steel, aluminium, stainless , whatever, but not enough to affect anything.
 

xjwmx

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I vaguely remember a professor saying aluminum slowly compresses so won't hold torque
 

xjwmx

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That's probably why all the motorcycle engines fall to bits, aluminium in the engines compresses, the bolts get loose and the engine falls apart. It all makes sense now!
Haha. Dunno. Might have to do with the shape. He was talking about aluminum wiring that loses compression at the screw terminals over time and starts a fire.
 

Jim

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I vaguely remember a professor saying aluminum slowly compresses so won't hold torque
Well that explains why a half a dozen airplanes crash into my back yard every week.
 
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