I'm a serious 1st time rider and owner looking for advice on anything/everything to do with 1980 Yamaha xs 650 hard tail old school bobber

paulywantabobber93

Old school bobber hard tail my style will talk any
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Open for any advice from anyone who has knowledge experience with old school hardtail bobbers first time owner needing advice about anything and everything to do with the bike thanks in advance
 
Okay, you're not going to like this, but...

If you haven't already bought the bike...don't. Hardtails LOOK sexy as hell but they're uncomfortable to ride for any length of time, most likely have sketchy handling and less than optimal brakes. There's a reason suspension was developed.

Someone who rides and loves a hard-tail will no doubt come along and call me (with some justification) an old fuddy-duddy. Good for them, you should ride what you like, but my point is that, IMHO, it's a poor choice for a first bike. Get a traditional bike, get some miles under your belt, THEN try out a hardtail and see if you actually enjoy riding it.

If you already have the bike, that same someone can give you pointer specific to the genre.
 
Yeah I completely understand what I'm getting myself into definitely won't be doing any long distance runs. It's just to get me from home to work and back home. After I get this one and ride it for a few months I plan on getting another motorcycle with full suspension the hard tail is just something to ride here and there and have fun with them in 5 are 6 months get something me and the wife can both ride together like I said above.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
Check out this new to me thread.
Nearly always a bike that looks like that and was dumped off cheap has several issues you're quickly going to delving into. The trick is figuring out those problems before you are calling your wife to come pick you up.
Good thing you are in Florida, that sits really low and will strenuously object to going around corners.
 
How talented a mechanic are you, first of all?

A, these are old bikes. Very few shops work on them as standard.
B, Maybe 10% of those few shops will touch a chop.
C, It's GOING to break. Shit will fall off, crack & vibrate loose.

Custom bikes are my true love, but you genuinely have to be able to fix literally anything yourself. Hardtail frames aren't just tough on you, they're hell on electrics, oil lines, engine mounts, seat & tank mounts, gas tanks (unless they're isolated) pretty much everything bolted or welded to the frame or bolted or welded to anything bolted or welded to the frame is at risk.

You also have no idea what the builder did or compromised (there are ALWAYS compromises) that he was willing to live with, when he built it.

Honestly, unless you're 100% confident in your ability to diagnose & rectify any problem, often at the side of the road (at night, in the rain 😏) I would suggest starting your motorcycling life off with something modern, easy, comfortable & reliable.
 
Here’s something to consider with that set-up. How tall are you and how much do you weigh? Most custom bikes are set-up for the builder.
 
How talented a mechanic are you, first of all?

A, these are old bikes. Very few shops work on them as standard.
B, Maybe 10% of those few shops will touch a chop.
C, It's GOING to break. Shit will fall off, crack & vibrate loose.

Custom bikes are my true love, but you genuinely have to be able to fix literally anything yourself. Hardtail frames aren't just tough on you, they're hell on electrics, oil lines, engine mounts, seat & tank mounts, gas tanks (unless they're isolated) pretty much everything bolted or welded to the frame or bolted or welded to anything bolted or welded to the frame is at risk.

You also have no idea what the builder did or compromised (there are ALWAYS compromises) that he was willing to live with, when he built it.

Honestly, unless you're 100% confident in your ability to diagnose & rectify any problem, often at the side of the road (at night, in the rain 😏) I would suggest starting your motorcycling life off with something modern, easy, comfortable & reliable.
Excellent advice.
 
A warm welcome to you..
I dont have a Bobber, I have a 1980 TCI tracker called Taffy.
Endless hours of expense tempered by endless hours of spannering.
But a joy to own and work on. These bikes get under your skin like no other.
Can’t offer advice on Bobbers but check our my build thread for encouragement and depression in equal amounts.
It’s great here with well meaning knowledgable people willing to help.
Good luck and good times ahead assured.
 
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