Is it my turn? Anything to do with lathes, mills and other shop tools

Downeaster

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Well for that price how could you resist?

Exactly. Just got back, it's in over all good shape, needs a new power cord and the reciprocating arm shimmed, perhaps a spacer/bushing on the drive shaft.

Guy was tickled to see it going to someone who will fix it up and use it.

He got it from a famous local wooden boat builder, his son was going to restore it but moved and ran out of space, and doesn't need it or have room for it in his shop. I'll have to to a little shuffling but I want to put it on it's own roll-around stand. Be nice for cutting pieces off longer stock without burning up slitting discs or dismounting my portaband that I have set up as a vertical bandsaw.
 

Downeaster

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Questions:

1. The blade currently installed is oriented to cut on the push stroke. I would think it would work better cutting on the pull stroke. Thoughts?

2. The guy I got it from recommended a 1 inch wide blade (vs. the usual 1/2 inch) to reduce blade deflection and cut wandering. Makes perfect sense to me. However, looking around the 1x12 blades I'm seeing are quite course, 12 and 14 TPI apparently being the norm. I was thinking more like 24TPI. Am I off base here?
 

arcticXS

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Questions:

1. The blade currently installed is oriented to cut on the push stroke. I would think it would work better cutting on the pull stroke. Thoughts?

2. The guy I got it from recommended a 1 inch wide blade (vs. the usual 1/2 inch) to reduce blade deflection and cut wandering. Makes perfect sense to me. However, looking around the 1x12 blades I'm seeing are quite course, 12 and 14 TPI apparently being the norm. I was thinking more like 24TPI. Am I off base here?
Actually, the blade should be according to the thickness of the stock you are cutting. Rule of thumb is that at least 3 teeth should be engaged at any time. Using 1" by 1/4" flatbar as an example: If clamped vertically, then 12 TPI is as
coarse as you want to go. If that flat bar was 1/8" thick, then 24 TPI would be needed.
However, if cutting heavy stock, a fine pitch blade has a tendency to overheat. This because the "pockets" between the teeth are too small to hold the swarf created, which leads to friction and heat.
So if that same flat bar is clamped horisontally, then a coarser pitch is better.
 
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kshansen

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I know hand powered hack saws work on the push, at least that's how I was taught t o use them.

But I know the somewhat larger version of this new saw you have we had at the quarry shop was set up to cut on the pull. Not saying that was right but that's how we had it running!

https://technologystudent.com/equip1/phcksw1.htm
 
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fredintoon

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IIRC, the last one I used that looked like that cut on the push.

Hi Marty,
the saw's slider-bar is lined up above the crank wheel's axle so the saw blade goes faster on the push stroke than it does on the pull stroke.
Swap the blade tooth direction to suit the required cutting speed.
 

Paul Sutton

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Does that have the little cylinder lifter for the return stroke? These saws are "Tried and True" do a fantastic job. Most I have seen and used cut on the forward stroke then a small lifter cylinder raises the blade clear of the metal for the return stroke.
 

Downeaster

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So I've been doing a little surfing...

From the on-line manuals I've seen, it appears that the preferred method is to cut on the draw stroke.

It does have the lifter assembly, but it's not clear to me if it lifts on the push or the draw stroke. I'll know more when I get it back together.

I have the original Covel Excel version, NOT the Craftsman/Atlas/Dunlop re-brand. About the only difference as far as I can tell is that some of the re-brands don't have the automatic cut-off switch.

It also appears that having the complete original vise assembly is somewhat unusual. Being as it is easy to remove (no fasteners) it often gets lost.

Finally, one Ewe Toob video shows one working that the guy claims he paid $500 for! I'm thinking that falls into the PT Barnum group of folks...
 

kshansen

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I haven't seen one since jr high school metal class back in the early 70's.
Talk of the metal class gave me a flash back to when Scott was using the foot operated shear to cut off a strip of sheet metal he was going to use to make a ring from. This was one of those ones that you stomped on the big foot lever to make the cut.

Well to make the short, he did make the index finger on the left hand about and inch shorter!
 

Wingedwheel

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Used to use one to cut pieces of pipe for spacers. One thing we did learn was the finer the TPI the easier the blade clogged and caused issues. Most times the blade would bind and break or pop off. It was amazing how well those coarser blades would “bite” through that steel.
 

azman857

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Talk of the metal class gave me a flash back to when Scott was using the foot operated shear to cut off a strip of sheet metal he was going to use to make a ring from. This was one of those ones that you stomped on the big foot lever to make the cut.

Well to make the short, he did make the index finger on the left hand about and inch shorter![/QUOTE]

I managed to smash my RT lndex finger tip on one of those. I mean smashed flat. Hangs about 45* down from normal.
 

Downeaster

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It's back together and mostly working.

Its supposed to have an adjustable gib under the main frame between it and the lift arm. That's missing which is most of the reason why it bounces around a little. Also, the lift mechanism needs to be adjusted a tad. Easy enough, just need to get to it. Lastly, the auto shutoff switch needs to be reinstalled and wired.

Note to self: Yes, Virginia, it DOES matter which way the bull gear turns! There's a cam on the back of it that operates the lift mechanism and if it's turning bass ackwards, it screws the timing up, won't cut and tears the blade off the main frame...
 

Rhy650

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Hello all. I have a 9" South Bend lathe that I am hoping to move into my shop soon and could use a little advice. The lathe was a restoration project of Dad's and is currently sitting in his shop. I made the decision to sell my antiquated radial arm saw and now have a space for it, but have never moved a lathe. Do you think a HF engine lift is up to the job? Any special considerations?

upload_2021-12-13_9-20-41.jpeg
 
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