Is it my turn? Anything to do with lathes, mills and other shop tools

gggGary

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The jack project has been jacking me around. The end cap had been ground down so far by getting dragged on the floor that I couldn't get it to seal, oil everywhere. Typical 4 projects back, got the TIG in the garage, cord end changed to match shop 220, wiring fault (mine) fixed, gas leak repaired.
Built up and turned down the end cap.
KIMG0276.JPG
Also welded some pivot pins that I had to grind out to remove, even 50 years ago not everything was designed for service. So back together waiting for silicone to set will fill tomorrow and hopefully get a bike back on the lift.
Santa hinted I'm getting a grinder.....:unsure:
 

RustiePyles

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The jack project has been jacking me around. The end cap had been ground down so far by getting dragged on the floor that I couldn't get it to seal, oil everywhere. Typical 4 projects back, got the TIG in the garage, cord end changed to match shop 220, wiring fault (mine) fixed, gas leak repaired.
Built up and turned down the end cap.
View attachment 204337
Also welded some pivot pins that I had to grind out to remove, even 50 years ago not everything was designed for service. So back together waiting for silicone to set will fill tomorrow and hopefully get a bike back on the lift.
Santa hinted I'm getting a grinder.....:unsure:
steviewonder.jpg

Some wheels for your new grinder....:jk: TIG is definitely one of those things that takes lots and lots of practice, and can be very frustrating. Weld looks a little on the cold side. What was your amperage?
 

gggGary

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View attachment 204350
Some wheels for your new grinder....:jk: TIG is definitely one of those things that takes lots and lots of practice, and can be very frustrating. Weld looks a little on the cold side. What was your amperage?
Thanks Rusty! An import AC DC with more knobs than I'll ever unnerstand, I know very little bout TIG, always seduced by the grab n spray MIG. Yeah a big cold lump of cast and not structural, was worried about warping the casting. Just adding some metal where it had been ground away so it'll seal. but the arc easily melted the cast, puddles flowed and joined to get bonding. Had 'r set about 80 amps, running on the finger trigger not the pedal. About my 4th TIG welder but none were much used, this seems to be very simple to get a nice arc. but I still contaminated the tungsten, like 6 times, duh-oh. Will try to play with it some more see if I can get half way decent welds. Fraid I'll always just be a bodger. Allison needs a saddle rack welded back into her aluminum trailer that'll be fun. This Miller helmet (now with new batteries) is a real game changer also. I can see, and no arc flash! LOL I went through about 5 auto helmets finding one that really works correctly, easy with MIG, but not so simple with TIG.
 

RustiePyles

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Thanks Rusty! An import AC DC with more knobs than I'll ever unnerstand, I know very little bout TIG, always seduced by the grab n spray MIG. Yeah a big cold lump of cast and not structural, was worried about warping the casting. Just adding some metal where it had been ground away so it'll seal. but the arc easily melted the cast, puddles flowed and joined to get bonding. Had 'r set about 80 amps, running on the finger trigger not the pedal. About my 4th TIG welder but none were much used, this seems to be very simple to get a nice arc. but I still contaminated the tungsten, like 6 times, duh-oh. Will try to play with it some more see if I can get half way decent welds. Fraid I'll always just be a bodger. Allison needs a saddle rack welded back into her aluminum trailer that'll be fun. This Miller helmet (now with new batteries) is a real game changer also. I can see, and no arc flash! LOL I went through about 5 auto helmets finding one that really works correctly, easy with MIG, but not so simple with TIG.
I know it's counter intuitive, but more amps will actually impart less heat into the work piece. Under amp will overheat your piece every time. Higher amps will allow you to move faster and impart less "heat soak".
 

TwoManyXS1Bs

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I bought a new shop tool today. Picked up a second hand no-mar tire changing stand with all the extras. Not a bad grab for $200, normal retail would be over $1k...

Excellent!

I looked into the HF tire changer, then found that they discontinued the motorcycle wheel accessory. Well, foo.

Wanted a low-profile jack, to get under a bike.
Keep it cheep.
So, took an old $25 2-ton jack.
20211102_2TonJack-Mod01.jpg

Too tall.
Ok, lop off the saddle,
20211102_2TonJack-Mod02.jpg

And weld a plate there.
20211102_2TonJack-Mod03.jpg

With a plywood pad, it's only 4" tall.
20211102_2TonJack-Mod04.jpg

Fits under my Vegas just fine.
20211102_2TonJack-Mod05.jpg20211107_RearTire01.jpg
 
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TwoManyXS1Bs

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Needed new tires, contacted the closest bike shop, asking about "bring in your wheels and tires". Good grief, they want $65 per wheel, and it's a 2-week waiting list.

Ok, doit my self, then.

Nail some boards together.
With ball bearings on the ends.
20211107_RearTire02.jpg

They overlap to make a work base.
20211107_RearTire03.jpg

The wheel is supported, so the sprocket or brake disc clears the floor.
20211107_RearTire04.jpg20211107_RearTire05.jpg

Use the tractor's bucket forks to break the bead.
20211107_RearTire10.jpg

After (*grunt*) swapping the tire, the wood base is uprighted.
Then the ball bearings and the axle can be used for balancing.
20211107_RearTire06.jpg20211108_RearTire11.jpg
 

Ratranger

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I did 8 tires on the ground last year, because of how much places want to change a tire. $65+ tax and disposal fees, add in the 20-30minute drive each way and its really not worth it. The no-mar setup showed up on marketplace a couple days ago and I tried to resist but it was still there after waiting 2 days, so now it's mine.
 

Grimly

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I bought a new shop tool today. Picked up a second hand no-mar tire changing stand with all the extras. Not a bad grab for $200, normal retail would be over $1kView attachment 205323
Lovely job.
Beats the pants off doing it on the floor, and a bargain, too.

For anyone who wants to do it on the cheap, here's mine...

DSC_0006.jpg
 

toglhot

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I have an Optimum Maschinen lathe, 280 x 600, I bought about nine years ago. This is my fifth lathe. Optimum Mscbined are a German company with a manufacturing plant in China, so the lathes are Chinese, but made to German specs. It came with the standard sheet metal stand which I didn't like, so I made another stand for it with an inbuilt levelling system and a coolant system. The levelling system, using a precision level, trues the bed to within 0.02mm and takes 5 - 10 minutes..
The stand in in two sections: The bottom section has two shelves for chucks, faceplates, travelling steadies and so on, the lower shelf holds small stock. Above that is a metrology drawer for callipers, micrometers and so on, above that is a small shelf for screwdrivers, chuck Jaws and other small items. The top section is made of heavy angle iron in an H shape, with a fine thread bolt welded underneath in each corner. These bolts sit in holes drilled in the bottom section and adjust the bed via two nuts, one to level the other to lock it off.
The coolant pump is a $20 centrifugal pump mounted inside the cupboard on the back wall. Initially, the coolant tank was mounted on the back, but has since been moved to the side for ease of access. A 12mm tube joins the pump to the coolant tank and the pump pumps coolant up through a tube to two take offs which deliver coolant to the nozzles up top. There is a tap fitted between the take offs and the coolant tank, this adjusts the amount of coolant delivered, to the nozzles.
The coolant flow to the tank is via a 25mm pipe with inlets from the swarf tray. Both nozzles have taps fitted at the ended. All the piping and connectors are retic fittings from the local hardware. The system is sealed, looping system, so coolant flows in a loop continuously from tam tank to pump and back to the tank. This system aerates the coolant and very little is lost due to the sealed system.
I've been using this system since I bought the lathe nine years ago, no problems have arisen and best of all, no smell. I think I've probably changed the coolant about 4 or 5 times since it's been in operation, but is topped up regularly due to loss from the chuck spraying the coolant around and evaporation and wastage from the swarf tray.
 

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gggGary

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Two Commandos, is that greed or glutton for punishment?
Into the bowels of the 850 motor, :eek: with continuing bad news, I'm going with the latter.

But
KIMG0340.JPG
that vice is about 60 pounds, left it for 3 days, no leaks no sag. :geek:
 
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toglhot

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The mill. Bought this little mill about 8 months ago. I'd like bigger, but I simply don't have the room and most of my work is small items anyway. It does a Good job, but a little slow due to only being able to take small cuts. Only have end mills at the moment, a fly cutter will join the setup later. I made a stand for it with three shelves for vices and whatever underneath. Swarf tray is aluminum, it catches a lot, but the mill still sprays chips everywhere, damn messy things. The arbor retaining bolt was Whitworth, so I had to make another for the M12 arbors.
 

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toglhot

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I've made a lot of accessories for lathes over the years, ball turners, scissor knurlers reverse tumbles and so on. This is a drill sharpening jig I made quite a few years ago. Normally I sharpen by hand, but occasionally I use a jig when I require the shoulders to be identical lengths, for boring accurate holes on the lathe. Yeah, yeah, I know that's what reamers are for. But I don't want a 6.2mm hole for a 6mm bolt, I much prefer a 6mm hole. I also made the box for it and the tables for the grinder. The Chinese writing says 'drill sharpening jig' (I think). Everyone knows the best tools come from China, so this gives my jig more credence. Point angle is set at 118 and cut and relief angle are set by tilting the table. I haven't found thinning the webs necessary, so I don't bother. I didn't have a mill when I made this, so all work was done on the lathe.
 

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toglhot

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This is another lathe accessory I made, a scissor knurler. I bought the knurling wheels on ebay for a few bucks, the rest I made on the lathe using a vertical slide for milling. It does a respectable job, although, I'll have to get a better bolt for clamping onto the work.
 

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gggGary

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FB snag today.
KIMG0384.JPG
About 5 hours of work doing a no parts needed overhaul, biggy was 4 screws snapped off so drill easy um hard out retap, and it's working good. Light air compressor m/l 30psi good for an air brush, dusting etc. and 20 inches of vacuum. Diaphragm pump. Could prolly bump those numbers a bit with a little more massaging. Had a vac pump long ago and missed having one around.
 
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