Is it my turn? Anything to do with lathes, mills and other shop tools

Beags64

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Always keep an eye out for cool old tools and stumbled across this at a garage sale today. Does run and seems to be all there. Good cleanin' and a tune up should be yield a useable machine....



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...and for the $50 asking price damn sure couldn't say "No"....lol
 

jetmechmarty

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Always keep an eye out for cool old tools and stumbled across this at a garage sale today. Does run and seems to be all there. Good cleanin' and a tune up should be yield a useable machine....



View attachment 221777

...and for the $50 asking price damn sure couldn't say "No"....lol
I know what that is and I’ve used them! :thumbsup:
 

Downeaster

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Always keep an eye out for cool old tools and stumbled across this at a garage sale today. Does run and seems to be all there. Good cleanin' and a tune up should be yield a useable machine....



View attachment 221777

...and for the $50 asking price damn sure couldn't say "No"....lol
I picked up one exactly like that as a freebie. Can't get the damn thing to work properly, seems like the ratchet that controls blade height and vertical movement is worn out, keeps jamming up and spitting the blade off.

Let me know how you make out with yours and pass on any tips you may have.
 

Beags64

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I picked up one exactly like that as a freebie. Can't get the damn thing to work properly, seems like the ratchet that controls blade height and vertical movement is worn out, keeps jamming up and spitting the blade off.

Let me know how you make out with yours and pass on any tips you may have.

Will do
 

kshansen

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We had one very close to that one Beags64 posted at the shop at the quarry. It was a bit on the worn out side but if what you were cutting did not need to be that precise it was okay. Nice thing is you could clamp, say a 4 inch angle iron, in the vice turn it on and walk away. It would sit there chugging away and shut it's self off when done.
 

toglhot

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I was looking at one of these a few years ago, simply because they looked to have a simplistic design, but I ended up with a bandsaw instead. Power hacksaws are awfully slow!
 

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RustiePyles

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Always keep an eye out for cool old tools and stumbled across this at a garage sale today. Does run and seems to be all there. Good cleanin' and a tune up should be yield a useable machine....



View attachment 221777

...and for the $50 asking price damn sure couldn't say "No"....lol
Very cool! Starett does still make blades for those.
 

atom4488

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Always keep an eye out for cool old tools and stumbled across this at a garage sale today. Does run and seems to be all there. Good cleanin' and a tune up should be yield a useable machine....



View attachment 221777

...and for the $50 asking price damn sure couldn't say "No"....lol
Awesome! I have the exact same saw, got it as a freebie when I bought my Logan 820. I have restored mine both functionally and cosmetically, but it is a working machine in my shop, not a show pony. It is therefore perpetually dirty/oily, despite periodic cleaning. The mechanism that is intended to lift the saw on the backstroke is not very functional, so it was removed on mine. It does not cut very straight, no matter how much you fiddle with it, but what it does do is cut heavy stock on its own while you do other stuff and shuts itself off when its done. That I like immensely.
 

atom4488

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I picked up one exactly like that as a freebie. Can't get the damn thing to work properly, seems like the ratchet that controls blade height and vertical movement is worn out, keeps jamming up and spitting the blade off.

Let me know how you make out with yours and pass on any tips you may have.
DE, mine has the ratchet removed altogether, which works fine. If i understand it correctly, the ratchet mechanism is only there to lift the blade on the backstroke.
 

kopcicle

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I haven't done much in the last month because of other pressing projects. I did however find this gem .
 

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Downeaster

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Dang Craigslist Free section bit me again...

saw3.jpg


saw2.jpg


saw1.jpg


No data plate that I can find, but the lower blade guard says Craftsman and the motor says Walker-Turner. Signed up for the Old Wood Working Tools forum on Vintage Machinery, one reply says W-T, 1937-1940 roughly. 16 inch wheels, 17x18 table.

Everything turns freely and seems to be mostly complete.

Appears to have fallen over at some point, the upper blade guard (very thin cast aluminum) is all stove to hell and patched back together with fiberglass patches and the upper wheel was broken in several places and brazed back together. Nice job of brazing, but the wheel has some wobble.

Right now the only thing I KNOW it needs is new tires. Might be missing some bits on the upper and lower blade guides, I'll know more later today.

Plan "A" is to see if I can slow it down enough to use for metal cutting (with the appropriate blade, of course) without irreversibly modifying anything. Thinking a gearbox between the motor and drive pulley.
 

Downeaster

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Check my thinking here:

One possibility for the future of the bandsaw is conversion to cutting metal.

Preliminary research indicates that about 100 SFM is a reasonable target speed for most metals, with the understanding that that will vary depending on thickness and type of metal.

With a 16" wheel, I get roughly 50" per revolution ( pi * D) so I'd need to slow the drive wheel down to around 24 RPM.

I have built a couple of things using 2HP treadmill motors for variable speed. My 2x72 belt sander works GREAT with that motor.

I'm assuming that torque is reduced with speed so I'd still need some mechanical reduction to keep motor speed up, but I suspect I could manage that with properly chosen v-belt pulleys.

Anybody tried this or am I fooling myself?
 

gggGary

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Check my thinking here:

One possibility for the future of the bandsaw is conversion to cutting metal.

Preliminary research indicates that about 100 SFM is a reasonable target speed for most metals, with the understanding that that will vary depending on thickness and type of metal.

With a 16" wheel, I get roughly 50" per revolution ( pi * D) so I'd need to slow the drive wheel down to around 24 RPM.

I have built a couple of things using 2HP treadmill motors for variable speed. My 2x72 belt sander works GREAT with that motor.

I'm assuming that torque is reduced with speed so I'd still need some mechanical reduction to keep motor speed up, but I suspect I could manage that with properly chosen v-belt pulleys.

Anybody tried this or am I fooling myself?
Let's see the lower saw from the other side.
3 phase motors on VFD is my go to for variable speed.
could also drive a buffer ;)
 

Mike G

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My experience with industrial motors and VFD's is that torque is constant from minimum to rated speed (don't remember how slow this would hold true since we didn't normally run them that slow), so power is directly proportional to speed up to the nameplate speed. You could generally go up to 10% over the rated speed without any concerns. Anything after that we would have to do more research.
 

Downeaster

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My stash saves me again...

When I went through the motor that came with the saw, I was pleasantly surprised to see that it ran, but seemed a bit sluggish on the start. It would start and run with no load but there was just a split-second's hesitation.

When I "bread boarded" a gear reduction set up with the original saw motor and a 20:1 gearbox (also from my stash) the motor wouldn't start without a little flip of the pulley. I'd cleaned and checked the start switch, and it ran perfectly once up to speed so I suspected the start capacitor was bad. And only 80-ish years old too...

While I was contemplating what to do about that ( I REALLY want to run the original W-T branded motor!) my other brain cell stirred for a moment and I said to myself "Self," I said, "I believe I may have a suitable cap in that box of such-like stuff in the basement shop..."

The original was 341MFD, the one I found (new in the box!) in my stash was 5xx but I figured that's probably close enough. A little snippage here and a little crimpage there, and voila! the motor starts like a champ!

Also dusted off my (alleged) machining skills and turned the jury-rigged output shaft on the gearbox to accept a 5/8 bore pulley and milled a keyway slot in it. Then took a piece of 7/8 round stock and turned up an output shaft that will fit in the through-hole output shaft of the gearbox. 3/4 with slot for a pulley, 18mm with slot for the bore and a 1/2-13 threaded end to hold it all in place.

Now I'm working on making up some bronze blade guides. There are six and the ones that aren't missing are worn plumb out. I got a piece of bronze square stock from McMaster-Carr that is oversized and rough. After some guesstimating and a lot of milling I have a .60 by .50 by 1.0 block with .325 slots .80 deep on both sides and a centered .25 by .700 through slot for the adjusting screw.

1 down, 5 to go...
 
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