Is it my turn? Anything to do with lathes, mills and other shop tools

Downeaster

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FBS1.jpg


FBS2.jpg


The metal cutting bandsaw conversion is officially complete. Decided it would be easier to just buy the correct blade rather than dick around trying to weld my own. I'll still try that for the experience, but at least I can cut metal while I'm experimenting.

Original driven pulley was 12" and that was TOO slow. Ordered a 6" off McMaster and a suitable belt and that seems to be about the right compromise between cutting speed and heat.

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Motor is adjustable left/right and forward/backward to align the belt to the gear reduction. Gearbox is adjustable in both planes as well to align the belt with the driven pulley.

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Bronze blade guides came out well. Only thing left is to try and find a new upper wheel to replace the one that's been brazed back together and flops around like a wounded duck. With new tires on the wheels and a the proper tension, the blade DOES stay on the wheel, so it could be worse.
 

atom4488

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Ok, my turn... Logan Model 820 circa late '40's-early '50's. It was in truly awful aesthetic condition when I bought it, but in reasonable mechanical condition. Restored 12 years ago or so, as a working lathe, not a museum piece. QCTP upgrade, some basic collets, shop-made collet drawbar, shop-made indexing attachment, shop-made toolpost-mounted drilling attachment (orientable to drill either the face of the workpiece or outer circumference). No pics of the attachments, but can take some if there is an interest...
Lots of other shop-made stuff; mini hydraulic press, sandblasting pressure pot, band roller, lathe accessories, and so on. Besides the lathe, shop is equipped with a compressor, bandsaw, several drill presses, MIG, oxyacetylene, blast cabinet, abrasive and carbide chop saws, mechanical hacksaw, shear, various sanders/grinders. Two big missing items are TIG and a mill. TIG is probably next on the list. Just passed on what would have been a suitable mill, because its too much of a new rabbit-hole to dive into ($ and space).

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Marlin72xs

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It is cool.
When I was a teenager an old guy in town had Stieber's Machine Shop, the equipment ancient and overhead shaft driven. I believe he had a large 3 phase motor running the shafts when I knew him in the early 1970's
I had him do a few minor things for me but it used up a lot of teenager' patience to get him to do it.
"Teenager patience!" I had to have a lot of that with my Dad! When I needed something, we didn't go out and buy it. We would just go downstairs and he would make it. He was a "Tool & Die" engineer for Bendix Aviation in Teterboro, NJ. The place is leveled now. Yep, my kids never had, or so it seemed, as much teenager patience as I had.
 

arcticXS

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Definitely for special purposes. I once visited the Kværner hydropower machine shop while they still were in Oslo. Their vertical turret lathe must have had at least a 5 m (16-17 ft) table diameter. They used it for turning the shaft coupling and labyrinth seal surfaces on big Francis hydro power turbine runners. I believe the largest Kværner turbine has 350 MW output. (close to 500 000 horsepower) Indeed big machines.
Don't you want his in your shop, even if there is no conceivable reason to own it?
Described as a vertical turret lathe.

View attachment 234500
For scale that table is 52" across.
 
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