Just out of curiosity - Airplane Guys

During a routine maintenance to service a fuel line, someone left a handheld flashlight inside the engine compartment and then test fired the engine. The resulting damage is said to have totaled the engine. Iā€™d hate to be the guy that left the flashlight in there! šŸ˜¬

https://www.newsbreakapp.com/n/0qqD2eQb?pd=04dsPR4T&lang=en_US&s=i16&send_time=1705681284
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One of the GE units doing GT inspections at power stations rather famously forgot to count their dial indicators and mag bases...alas, left in place measuring the slack in the variable intake vanes...seem yesterday...must be 20 years... People drop stuff a lot when they don't give a chit or are badly disposed. o! I forgot, it came lose...
 
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Or was he?
 
I never liked working on those aircraft....pain in the ass for us Fuel Systems Maintenance folks.

Being a single engine aircraft they have an Emergency Power Unit that is fired by Hydrazine in a catalyst bed....bad, bad juju messing with that stuff.

Anytime they had one either leak or fire in flight we had to evacuate the pilot by meeting him in our full rubber suits, boots, Scott Air packs, etc...

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Dont know anything about flying But Mr Erdogan in Turkey is very eager to buy this 50 year old Product
Or have them for free who knows He is the world's greatest trickster

Nevertheless impression is that someone actually for once have performed at work . Difficult to ignore even though there are more parts in the setup
I would imagine Mr Erdogan also wants . Weapons ..

Can be difficult for Mr Erdogan to sign a contract lets se.
 
I never liked working on those aircraft....pain in the ass for us Fuel Systems Maintenance folks.

Being a single engine aircraft they have an Emergency Power Unit that is fired by Hydrazine in a catalyst bed....bad, bad juju messing with that stuff.

Anytime they had one either leak or fire in flight we had to evacuate the pilot by meeting him in our full rubber suits, boots, Scott Air packs, etc...

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I loved 'em. Quick story...
Summer of '77. The first production F16 was still being put together and schools were planned but still a year or two off. I was one of 3 selected to go out to Edwards to learn the jet. That's pretty heady stuff for a young 23yr old Buck Sgt. :geek:

My daughter was only about 2mo old, so the wife needed the car at home. Edwards is HUGE... no way I was flying out there and walking 'round the base all summer, so I loaded up the only bike that ran (trustworthy) at the time. Don't recall now if it was the R5 or an RD... was one of 'em. Had a Norton and a few others at the time, but didn't trust them much beyond walkin' home distance. :cautious: So yeah boys and girls, back in the day a 350 was considered a middleweight... and the little RD would do a cross country with the best of 'em. Fla to Death Valley took the better part of 4 days iirc, and several sets of plugs. After that I picked me up an XS650. :whistle: Anyway....

First day of duty was all about Hydrazine Safety. Yeah, scary stuff and the A. F. took it pretty serious. No one was allowed near one of the little YF's without the training.
Next day we sat down with the engineers that designed and built 'em... heady stuff, right? ACESII seat training and all that. After lunch we headed out to the hanger. The very first one I laid my greasy mitts on was the one pictured above... airframe #1. Here, almost 50yrs on I can still feel the rush.

Spent all that summer with class in the morning and working on the jets 'till well after dark. For a gearhead like me... it was heaven on earth.
In typical Air Force fashion, it was the end of next year ('79 maybe? :umm:) before we saw our first F-16 at Eglin. The two other guys had PCS'd (transferred) and I'd forgot about half of what I'd learned. By the time I left Eglin, we had 6 of 'em and I was about as knowledgeable as anyone on 'em.

I'll have to say, my time in test wing was definitely the highlight of my career. All good things come to an end though. The F-111 community had sunk their teeth in and pulled me back. Back to NATO, back to rifle ranges and gas chambers... back to staring down the Red Bear... sigh.
 
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By the time I left Eglin, we had 6 of 'em and I was about as knowledgeable as anyone on 'em.
Funny, I was the same way as you at, of all places....Eglin! Went there for FTD on the F-15 Eagle straight after Tech School.

I'll never forget stepping off the bus at Eglin and seeing my first real F-15 banking overhead in the pattern...like you said, what a rush! I was so hooked!

After a few days in class we actually got to go out and start doing aircraft familiarization, power-ons, etc...man I loved that aircraft. You never forget your first šŸ„°
 
Funny, I was the same way as you at, of all places....Eglin! Went there for FTD on the F-15 Eagle straight after Tech School.
We crossed paths fer sure... Went through the last F-4 FTD 'cross the way at the 33rd when they transitioned to F-15's. Then went to their F-15 class.
Was there (Eglin) from '76-ish to '83. You?
 
You guys from the service! I did 6 years of contract work on base signal corps, and was the only not-a-vet, and I miss my old pals... All that expensive work, and all the treasures spent, some of my pals didn't like that very much... I am jealous of the experience y'all have. But then I got to work on some strange things myself.
Anyway... flight school 101 enjoy!
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We crossed paths fer sure... Went through the last F-4 FTD 'cross the way at the 33rd when they transitioned to F-15's. Then went to their F-15 class.
Was there (Eglin) from '76-ish to '83. You?
Eglin in 84 with the 33rd. :thumbsup:
My time was only 4 years and I was pretty focused on my job. Some vets talk about being with the 44th. the 101st, the 82nd of this or that Battalion of the 8th or 4th Army. I know I was in "2nd LAAM" (Light Anti Aircraft Missile) but I do not remember what MAW (Marine Air Wing). Hell, we fixed radars and the command/control equiptment, we went to the field and shot down drone targets, walked some guard duty in the desert of Arizona and peeled potatoes when assigned mess duty.
 
My time was only 4 years and I was pretty focused on my job. Some vets talk about being with the 44th. the 101st, the 82nd of this or that Battalion of the 8th or 4th Army. I know I was in "2nd LAAM" (Light Anti Aircraft Missile) but I do not remember what MAW (Marine Air Wing). Hell, we fixed radars and the command/control equiptment, we went to the field and shot down drone targets, walked some guard duty in the desert of Arizona and peeled potatoes when assigned mess duty.
I was 2nd MAW MAG-26
 
I was 2nd MAW MAG-26
I was blissfully unaware of any command beyond beyond my battalion. We were on an air base with no infantry, no artillery, no boot camp. F4s, A6s flew off the air strip regularly and we went to our off base desert training area 10 miles from base every day. We lived in a cocoon in retrospect.
 
@Kevin Werner

I'm the same way. I was in the Naval Security Group. The entire command, from the Admiral commanding down to the lowliest boot recruit was maybe 1000 people at any given time. The "real" Navy barely knew we existed, didn't recognize our rating badges and generally looked down on us as "sand crabs" since we worked near salt water but didn't live in it like real sailors. The only distinction between us "spooks" was which of a fixed number of sites we'd been stationed at. It was not at all uncommon to do more than one tour at any given site. I did two in Misawa, Japan and two in Winter Harbor, Maine.
 
Further, just because I'm waxing nostalgic (it's been 33+ years since I retired)

Another common occurrence was seeing the same shipmates at various stations. NTTC (Naval Technical Training Center) Pensacola, Florida was, and still is, THE training facility for our specialty. Pretty much every CT (Cryptologic Technician) has been at P'cola at least once. There were (the CT rating no longer exists in it's original format) 6 sub-ratings: TAMORI

T-branch, technical analysists (T-birds)
A-branch, administrators
M-branch, electronics/electrical maintenance - my specialty. (Matmen)
O-branch, Operations folks, primarily running inter-site communication links
R- branch, Radio folks. Monitored Morse Code transmissions from various-ummmm-"sources". (Ditty Chasers)
I- branch, Interpretive, linguists that monitored voice transmissions in various languages.

I ran into Matmen (and women) that I knew from other duty stations pretty much everywhere I went. Some multiple times. One O-brancher and I were stationed together 3 times. Some folks in a fairly narrow specialty spent their entire careers rotating between 4 duty stations that were the only sites that supported their equipment. Oddly, two of my high school classmates were also CT's, one O-branch and one A-branch. I ran into two other classmates during my career, one a radarman on the Forrestal and the other a Navy Counselor that visited one of our sites.
 
I was stationed at RAF Lakenheath in England when I saw my first F-16. It flew in from Hill AFB Utah. It was 1979. Little did I know in 2 yrs I would be at Nellis AFB NV working Phased Docks on them. Later in the yr, I was on the flightline as a Crewchief on them. Our wing was the first combat wing with them.
the next year I was in Germany at Hahn AB. We were the first overseas combat wing of F-16's. 6 great years on them.
 
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