motorcycle tyres (tires)

Gordon

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Backroader, according to your number's that you posted, your tire was made in the 8th week of '08. Those number's in the (), are those the one's that appear to be like ,added', not like they were part of the original mold. In other word's, like they were put in the mold just before forming the tire? The af&x are coded for the plant, shift, worker, ect. Kinda like tracking number's.
 

Backroader

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If that's the case then that would explain the excellent condition of the tires. The previous owner of the bike only had it for year and bought it from another older fellow, who, I can only assume replaced the original tires to sell the bike with a safety inspection.

Thanks
 

jd750ace

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Hey guys, I noticed something missing here. A lot of the front tires I'm reading about are not rated for the duty weight of these bikes. I believe there is a picture in the article with a 52H weight range designation. I ran into this hard with my Roadstar, as lots of tires are available at a 71H weight rating, but that tire is nearly maxxed out on carrying capacity between an 850 pound bike and 250 pound rider. I got terrible handling once the tires were worn some, and they only lasted 5200-6000 miles. Granted, on a bike with 90 ft-lb of torque, I likes to twist it's nutz, but that was terrible mileage. Once I switched to (although more expensive) higher load rated tires (77H), which is "load range B" in big tire speak, I got 12K out of the rear. I'll find a load index chart and post the link, but them old skinny-ass Dunlop 100 series tires are made for 250's and such!

Here's the fastest chart I could find.

http://www.rivervalleypowerandsport...alersite/images/ec0433/892662_chart_36872.jpg
 
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XSLeo

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I doubt the weight rating was the difference in tire life. Your "weak" tires were probably designed with a softer rubber compound to have more grip. Like what a sprort bike needs.
Your "stronger" tires were probably made for a touring/crusier bike and has a harder rubber compound to give more tire life.
Most sport bike type tires only last a few thousand miles, but grip very well, they need to to hold in high speed cornering.
Most touring/crusier bikes aren't designed to preform as a sport bike and can use harder tires that last longer.
52 rated tires carry 441 lbs. Two carry 882 lbs. The xs650 weighs around 460, even with a 400 lb load the tires can still carry it.
I doubt most rear tires are rated that low.
The front tire doesn't carry as much of the weight as the rear.
I have the owners manual on my Harley. The bike weighs 632 lbs as shipped from the factory. That's probably dry weight. A few lbs more with oils and fuel. That adds around 50 lbs. So I can carry a load of me plus gear of about 400 lbs.
The max weight the bike can carry is 1085 lbs, front 390 lbs, rear 695 lbs. The tires are rated 57 front, 71 rear, that's a total of 1268. That's 183 lbs more than the bike can carry.
I think the XS650 can't carry as much weight as my Harley so the weight the tires can carry is just that much more than the bike can carry.
Leo
 

jd750ace

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I understand what you are saying. But the Pirelli MT66, Dunlop D404, and Bridgestone S11 are all designed for Cruiser/Touring bikes, not Sport. They are not "soft" by any means, and I understand that tires like the Michelin Commander and Metzler ME880 are made with tougher compounds. The front tire carries more weight than the rear under moderate to heavy braking loads, due to weight transfer. I understand tires are rated for intermediate loads such as this that are much higher than the max weight rating, which is based on continuous load at maximum inflation.
If I operate my pickup truck for 20 thousand miles at 6000 pounds on a fresh set of tires, then go 20 thousand at 8000 pounds with another set, I guarantee the second set will be much more worn, and the average stress over the life of the tire will be higher. That's what I'm saying about lower capacity tires. 71 H tires do not last on the Road Star, and 77's do, as some brands offer the same size in both load ratings.
 

motorshag

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Got some newbie questions about tires.

I have 1978 wheels on a 1977 Yamaha XS 650

Tires currently on the bike are as follows.

120/90-16 Back
100/90-19 Front

I want to put Shinko 712's (or something like these) on and was wondering if anyone could tell me if 130/90-16 would fit on the back. I did some research and ask some others questions on another forum, and was told that 130/90-16 was the stock size at one point.

I also wanted to go with a little wider tire in the front, but don't know if I can go wider than 100/90-19...like could I go up to a 110/90H-19, with the stock forks and spacers, and such?

Would appreciate any thoughts or help?
 

XSLeo

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Yes the 130/90-16 is the stock size on the 16 inch wheels. On the set of 34 mm forks setting here have about 5 inches of space between the forks at the narrowest place. That's about 127 mm. With a bit of space for clearance say 2.5 mm on each side leaves 122 mm This is without a fender, that may take some of the space.
A 120 may or may not fit. A 110 will. The width of a tire is nominal, it can be a bit bigger or smaller. Some brands run a bit narrow or a bit wide.
Do you have a repair manual. In most books their is a section that list the specs. In those specs are the wheel and tire sizes as were put on as stock.
Leo
 

motorshag

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Yes the 130/90-16 is the stock size on the 16 inch wheels. On the set of 34 mm forks setting here have about 5 inches of space between the forks at the narrowest place. That's about 127 mm. With a bit of space for clearance say 2.5 mm on each side leaves 122 mm This is without a fender, that may take some of the space.
A 120 may or may not fit. A 110 will. The width of a tire is nominal, it can be a bit bigger or smaller. Some brands run a bit narrow or a bit wide.
Do you have a repair manual. In most books their is a section that list the specs. In those specs are the wheel and tire sizes as were put on as stock.
Leo

Thanks. I have a repair manual, but I have moved recently, and It's on my list to dig out:)

Thanks LeoXS for the help. I think I am going to try the 110 for the front, and see if it looks, and feels right.
 

TwoManyXS1Bs

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You'll need to find your rim width/type.

Here's a couple of tire/rim recommended sizing charts:
 

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XSLeo

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I was just rereading this thread and found a bit of misinformation. One guy listed his DOT number as 088, another said that makes it eight week of 08 as in 2008. That's wrong. The three digit numbers are from before 2000. In 2000 they changed to a 4 digit number as in the pics at the start of the thread.
So if you have tires with a three digit code, take them off and hang on the wall.
I'm not sure just when they started putting the date code on tires but I have some old tires still laying around without a date code.
So if you have tires without a date code hang them beside the three digit coded tires.
Leo
 

Moabite

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XSLeo

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TM, Look for the DOT number on the other side of the tire. The DOT # is on both sides, The date is on just one side.
Leo
 

TwoManyXS1Bs

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TM, Look for the DOT number on the other side of the tire...

Hey, Leo. Okay, took these pics of the other side.
XS1B-RearTire-new-01.jpg
XS1B-RearTire-new-02.jpg XS1B-RearTire-new-03.jpg XS1B-RearTire-new-04.jpg XS1B-RearTire-new-05.jpg

All sorts of new markings nowadays. I don't think I see any DOT code on that side. It *is* a Tiawaneese Dunlop.

Back in the '70s shop daze, they started coming out with the "Traction, Temperature, Treadwear" markings. Quite handy for decision making. Don't recall seeing that anymore.

Found an MSF "tire guide" (9mb PDF download), quite interesting. Scroll down this library listing to find it.

https://www.msf-usa.org/library.aspx
 

Mailman

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