small victories -- won a race on Saturday

DogBunny

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Toot your own horn time... Took first place in the Master's Division (age 40 and above) of a race last Saturday. I'm 66, so I was competing against people 26 years younger than me.

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What's more, I came in 4th over all !

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Okay, now the rest of the story. First, this was a 5K run, not a motorcycle race. Second, the observant will note that the 2nd over-all finisher was also a Master -- he should have gotten the 1st place Master's trophy, not me. On the other hand, he's 18 years younger than me, when I was that age I would have run circles around him, and they gave the trophy to me, so I'm keeping it. And anyways, I, a 66 year-old man, came in 4th over-all, and they can't take that from me.

The secret to my success? Enter a race with not many participants. The field was only 109, mostly composed of not-really-runners.

If you're still reading -- I have been a runner my entire life. Started in 6th grade. Way before the running boom (the 1970s, according to Google). NOBODY
in the 6th grade trained back then. Won a few awards in junior high running the 100-yard dash, but that was pretty much it for success. But, I never stopped running.
Three decades ago, I'd do a race almost every weekend during the season (spring and fall). Most races are 5K, but I've run three marathons. I was never competitive at distances, but I really liked to run. Then, the entry fees started going up. Today, a cheap race will be $40-45, and it goes up to well over $100, especially for long races. Plus, they were just eating up too much of my weekend time, driving to the race, running, waiting for the awards ceremony, driving back, recuperating.
Will note that the race I won Saturday was FREE for veterans (me), a huge inducement for me to enter.
I haven't competed in one of these races in 30 years??? My thought was that I would start racing again when I turned 60. That is when you become a GRAND Master (not all races have a Grand Master category -- the race on Saturday didn't -- it depends on how big the race is). I figured most other runners have succumbed to time or inertia by that age, and I'm still running strong, so I thought I might have a chance. But, things kept thwarting me. For example, last year, I was training hard, but then I broke a toe. I recovered and then I impacted two bones in my foot, recovered from that, and then I was in a motorcycle accident that was minor, but badly injured both of me feet.
But now I'm back, greatly encouraged by this minor win, and looking forward to my next race with stiffer competition and a Grand Master division.
 
View attachment 316421
Toot your own horn time... Took first place in the Master's Division (age 40 and above) of a race last Saturday. I'm 66, so I was competing against people 26 years younger than me.

View attachment 316423
What's more, I came in 4th over all !

View attachment 316426

Okay, now the rest of the story. First, this was a 5K run, not a motorcycle race. Second, the observant will note that the 2nd over-all finisher was also a Master -- he should have gotten the 1st place Master's trophy, not me. On the other hand, he's 18 years younger than me, when I was that age I would have run circles around him, and they gave the trophy to me, so I'm keeping it. And anyways, I, a 66 year-old man, came in 4th over-all, and they can't take that from me.

The secret to my success? Enter a race with not many participants. The field was only 109, mostly composed of not-really-runners.

If you're still reading -- I have been a runner my entire life. Started in 6th grade. Way before the running boom (the 1970s, according to Google). NOBODY
in the 6th grade trained back then. Won a few awards in junior high running the 100-yard dash, but that was pretty much it for success. But, I never stopped running.
Three decades ago, I'd do a race almost every weekend during the season (spring and fall). Most races are 5K, but I've run three marathons. I was never competitive at distances, but I really liked to run. Then, the entry fees started going up. Today, a cheap race will be $40-45, and it goes up to well over $100, especially for long races. Plus, they were just eating up too much of my weekend time, driving to the race, running, waiting for the awards ceremony, driving back, recuperating.
Will note that the race I won Saturday was FREE for veterans (me), a huge inducement for me to enter.
I haven't competed in one of these races in 30 years??? My thought was that I would start racing again when I turned 60. That is when you become a GRAND Master (not all races have a Grand Master category -- the race on Saturday didn't -- it depends on how big the race is). I figured most other runners have succumbed to time or inertia by that age, and I'm still running strong, so I thought I might have a chance. But, things kept thwarting me. For example, last year, I was training hard, but then I broke a toe. I recovered and then I impacted two bones in my foot, recovered from that, and then I was in a motorcycle accident that was minor, but badly injured both of me feet.
But now I'm back, greatly encouraged by this minor win, and looking forward to my next race with stiffer competition and a Grand Master division.
View attachment 316421
Toot your own horn time... Took first place in the Master's Division (age 40 and above) of a race last Saturday. I'm 66, so I was competing against people 26 years younger than me.

View attachment 316423
What's more, I came in 4th over all !

View attachment 316426

Okay, now the rest of the story. First, this was a 5K run, not a motorcycle race. Second, the observant will note that the 2nd over-all finisher was also a Master -- he should have gotten the 1st place Master's trophy, not me. On the other hand, he's 18 years younger than me, when I was that age I would have run circles around him, and they gave the trophy to me, so I'm keeping it. And anyways, I, a 66 year-old man, came in 4th over-all, and they can't take that from me.

The secret to my success? Enter a race with not many participants. The field was only 109, mostly composed of not-really-runners.

If you're still reading -- I have been a runner my entire life. Started in 6th grade. Way before the running boom (the 1970s, according to Google). NOBODY
in the 6th grade trained back then. Won a few awards in junior high running the 100-yard dash, but that was pretty much it for success. But, I never stopped running.
Three decades ago, I'd do a race almost every weekend during the season (spring and fall). Most races are 5K, but I've run three marathons. I was never competitive at distances, but I really liked to run. Then, the entry fees started going up. Today, a cheap race will be $40-45, and it goes up to well over $100, especially for long races. Plus, they were just eating up too much of my weekend time, driving to the race, running, waiting for the awards ceremony, driving back, recuperating.
Will note that the race I won Saturday was FREE for veterans (me), a huge inducement for me to enter.
I haven't competed in one of these races in 30 years??? My thought was that I would start racing again when I turned 60. That is when you become a GRAND Master (not all races have a Grand Master category -- the race on Saturday didn't -- it depends on how big the race is). I figured most other runners have succumbed to time or inertia by that age, and I'm still running strong, so I thought I might have a chance. But, things kept thwarting me. For example, last year, I was training hard, but then I broke a toe. I recovered and then I impacted two bones in my foot, recovered from that, and then I was in a motorcycle accident that was minor, but badly injured both of me feet.
But now I'm
Great result DB, sounds like you had a ball of a time.
Maybe I should loose weight and dust off my race suit too?
 
Thanks everyone.
Honestly, it was no big deal. I just did what I always do three times a week. The real accomplishment, if any, was sticking with it my whole life.

I could write a book on health. To those who think they can't, or that they have an injury, you probably can, and you possibly don't. For example, there's this post by jetmechmarty (also in his 60s):
https://www.xs650.com/threads/nutrition-health-and-weight-loss.55531/page-25#post-833437
"Bad" backs, knees, etc., have a way of repairing themselves once you start using them.

About 20 years ago, I blew out my knee. A running over-use injury. I was in tremendous shape, and I was reluctant to stop running when I developed knee pain. I ended up walking with a limp, and I was convinced I was going to have that limp for the rest of my life. After about a year of rest, I started vigorous walking, working up to 4-miles. Then, I cautiously started running again. A couple more years, and I couldn't even remember which was the knee that I had injured.

Maybe 30 years ago, I developed plantar fasciitis, the bogeyman of running injuries. Very hard to get rid of. I didn't run for two years, but eventually I recovered from it.

Got a nasty case of elbow tendonitis a few years ago, a weightlifting over-us injury. Eventually got over it and got back to weightlifting.
The point is that after a period of rest, most injuries usually respond favorably to exercise.

Running is not for everyone. If you've never done it, do something else that you enjoy, but do something. Exercise will start a positive cascade. It will have an immediate effect of helping you sleep better. Then you'll be more rested, feel better, and you'll be able to exercise more. Physical well-being improves mental well-being. Your stress level will go down, and you'll better deal with what stress you do have. You'll start paying more attention to what you put into your body, eating healthier, and taking less prescriptions, pain-killers, alcohol. You will lose fat, gain muscle, and look better. All of these positive effects will enable you to exercise even more, and the whole positive cycle will repeat itself.
You just have to care enough about yourself to get started. It's not work. Living healthier is its own reward.
 
Thanks everyone.
Honestly, it was no big deal. I just did what I always do three times a week. The real accomplishment, if any, was sticking with it my whole life.

I could write a book on health. To those who think they can't, or that they have an injury, you probably can, and you possibly don't. For example, there's this post by jetmechmarty (also in his 60s):
https://www.xs650.com/threads/nutrition-health-and-weight-loss.55531/page-25#post-833437
"Bad" backs, knees, etc., have a way of repairing themselves once you start using them.

About 20 years ago, I blew out my knee. A running over-use injury. I was in tremendous shape, and I was reluctant to stop running when I developed knee pain. I ended up walking with a limp, and I was convinced I was going to have that limp for the rest of my life. After about a year of rest, I started vigorous walking, working up to 4-miles. Then, I cautiously started running again. A couple more years, and I couldn't even remember which was the knee that I had injured.

Maybe 30 years ago, I developed plantar fasciitis, the bogeyman of running injuries. Very hard to get rid of. I didn't run for two years, but eventually I recovered from it.

Got a nasty case of elbow tendonitis a few years ago, a weightlifting over-us injury. Eventually got over it and got back to weightlifting.
The point is that after a period of rest, most injuries usually respond favorably to exercise.

Running is not for everyone. If you've never done it, do something else that you enjoy, but do something. Exercise will start a positive cascade. It will have an immediate effect of helping you sleep better. Then you'll be more rested, feel better, and you'll be able to exercise more. Physical well-being improves mental well-being. Your stress level will go down, and you'll better deal with what stress you do have. You'll start paying more attention to what you put into your body, eating healthier, and taking less prescriptions, pain-killers, alcohol. You will lose fat, gain muscle, and look better. All of these positive effects will enable you to exercise even more, and the whole positive cycle will repeat itself.
You just have to care enough about yourself to get started. It's not work. Living healthier is its own reward.
I couldn’t agree more. I’m having to come from behind after 40 years of not trying to care for myself. It just means working through more pain. Going through with these lifestyle changes has changed my outlook about my future.

But, it is a big deal.
 
I couldn’t agree more. I’m having to come from behind after 40 years of not trying to care for myself. It just means working through more pain. Going through with these lifestyle changes has changed my outlook about my future.

But, it is a big deal.
:agree:
With you there Marty. As an ex rugby player, mountain biker 🚵‍♀️ and track runner; I feel ashamed of my physical fitness and appearance now. After boogering up two spinal discs playing rugby, then shagging my knee’s carpet fitting (sadly not :bed:) I sought a less fatiguing lifestyle. 20 years as a ‘rep on the road’ added 3 stone to my fighting weight. At 63 years old it’s hard to shift it. Catching sight of myself in a mirror after a shower makes me cringe. A life style change is required. I cook and eat healthily; but my weakness is daily wine consumption and a lack of willingness to exercise.

Time for change me thinks.

@DogBunny is an inspiration, and I must do better.
 
At 63 years old it’s hard to shift it. Catching sight of myself in a mirror after a shower makes me cringe.
You’re still up and about. You can fix that. Start by getting rid of sugar. Wine has sugar. Removing junk from your diet will take weight off. If you can’t immediately burn the carbohydrates you’re taking on, they turn to fat.
First step is to take the first step. Once you find yourself in a nursing home, it’s probably too late.
 
Start by getting rid of sugar. Wine has sugar.
Marty and I mostly agree on health, and out of respect I've been letting a lot slide on the "nutrition health and weight loss" thread, but since this is my thread, I have to say something here. Marty should have said get rid of refined or added sugar. The sugar in wine is simply the small amount of left over naturally occurring fructose from the grapes, that the yeast hasn't consumed, also known as residual sugar. There is absolutely nothing in the world wrong with naturally occurring fructose. It is in all fruits, berries, and some vegetables, and it is what humans are meant to eat. It is pretty much impossible to eat too much fruit or vegetables.
Having said that, the active ingredient in beer, wine and spirits is ethanol, and while considered a nutrient, it has no value at all other than adding calories to your diet, and possibly short-term relaxing you or making you feel good.
If you can’t immediately burn the carbohydrates you’re taking on, they turn to fat.
There is so much wrong with this statement I don't really know where to begin.
We are "engineered" to eat a high-carb diet. The current high-fat/high-protein craze is a shame. I know there are a lot of high fat/high protein weight loss success stories, but it isn't a sustainable diet, meaning that long-term, it is associated with increased cancer risk, heart disease, and much more. If you are getting most of your calories from fat and/or protein, then you probably aren't getting enough naturally occurring vitamins and minerals. If you try to make up for the deficit by popping a multivitamin with minerals pill -- well you may as well swill snake oil.
Don't want to get too preachy here, and I barely scratched the surface, but I could write a book on this.
 
Marty and I mostly agree on health, and out of respect I've been letting a lot slide on the "nutrition health and weight loss" thread, but since this is my thread, I have to say something here. Marty should have said get rid of refined or added sugar. The sugar in wine is simply the small amount of left over naturally occurring fructose from the grapes, that the yeast hasn't consumed, also known as residual sugar. There is absolutely nothing in the world wrong with naturally occurring fructose. It is in all fruits, berries, and some vegetables, and it is what humans are meant to eat. It is pretty much impossible to eat too much fruit or vegetables.
Having said that, the active ingredient in beer, wine and spirits is ethanol, and while considered a nutrient, it has no value at all other than adding calories to your diet, and possibly short-term relaxing you or making you feel good.

There is so much wrong with this statement I don't really know where to begin.
We are "engineered" to eat a high-carb diet. The current high-fat/high-protein craze is a shame. I know there are a lot of high fat/high protein weight loss success stories, but it isn't a sustainable diet, meaning that long-term, it is associated with increased cancer risk, heart disease, and much more. If you are getting most of your calories from fat and/or protein, then you probably aren't getting enough naturally occurring vitamins and minerals. If you try to make up for the deficit by popping a multivitamin with minerals pill -- well you may as well swill snake oil.
Don't want to get too preachy here, and I barely scratched the surface, but I could write a book on this.
Thanks DB & Marty.
I take on board both your points of view. DB is a more factual reasoning and confirms my friends (elite athlete) take on things. Many years ago I changed a very physically demanding work life for a travelling reps job. Travelled the world staying in hotels, eating top quality food and drinking far too much socialising with my customers. 20 years later I have an enlarged heart, T2 Diabetes and Hypertension. All now controlled by diet and meds, (I do all the cooking now and rarely eat out). I avoid refined sugars and eat healthily.

I know a bottle of wine can equal the calorific value of six chocolate bars; and that can’t be good.

With the guidance of my athletic friend (was a top UK surfer in his day) I am now following a low Carb / high protein diet. I will also rekindle my love of cycling as the weather improves.

You are both right however. It’s not too late to change whilst I still can.
It is too late when I physically can’t!

Thanks to you both.
 
When you are in "child care" full time for 3 years and it is tough to stay active besides cleaning up little messes or changing diapers. I got out of "child care"😪 2 months ago so can now spend some time on a stationary bike. I would rather be in child care.
 
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