The sickness is contagious...

Kevin Werner

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A friend of a friend has this... He has bad knees (who doesn't?) and is making space.
IMG_1361.jpeg
 
That thing needs a fork brace too. I know it's just a cranky old fart's attitude, but lots show with not much go is a bad combination in my book. Those shocks look like the ones sold for less than $100 a pair by Mike's XS and the other Revival outlets. Lots of money spent on show, lots of pennies pinched on go. I put that kind of "build" in the same category as bikes that are brought to rallies by guys who've polished for hours and spent no time at all on inspection and maintenance. (Don't take that personally, Pai Joao, you're a well respected friend anyway!)
 
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That thing needs a fork brace too. I know it's just a cranky old fart's attitude, but lots show with not much go is a bad combination in my book. Those shocks look like the ones sold for less than $100 a pair by Mike's XS and the other Revival outlets. Lots of money spent on show, lots of pennies pinched on go. I put that kind of "build" in the same category as bikes that are brought to rallies by guys who've polished for hours and spent no time at all on inspection and maintenance. (Don't take that personally, Pai Joao, you're a well respected friend anyway!)
What's your preference on fork braces?
 
The guy with eyes bigger than his stomach will say it.

You got your hands full sorting the hotrod already in your garage....................
 
I have a few sorting projects on the tracker including fork brace. :) Rubber mounting the risers has helped. It is now pretty close to daily ride status. The Cafe is represented as needing some sorting out. If I don't buy it I fear it may end up as another hard tail, I live close to Harley headquarters. When the seller said the $ number and negotiable I was pretty set. An inspection today or tomorrow will tell me more. I have an upholsterer that will work on the tracker seat this winter, better foam is needed. We can improve that seat. The rearset hardware is there, a new mount plate to move pegs down and forward is relatively easy. All depends . Thanks to all for your input
And, @grizld1, you are not cranky, just honest. I call the cheap flash "lipstick on a pig". :)
 
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I'm plenty cranky too, TW. Toglhot, when you remove the front fender you also remove the bracing that it provides. My primary reason to install a brace would be safety.

46th, I don't really have a preference, all kinds of things work. I'm using a Daytona brand fork stabilizer that I bought on clearance around 1993. It clamps onto the dust caps on the sliders. I was skeptical about how well that would work, but it's done a good job for many years.

Whatever you use, correct installation is critical. With no fender or brace on the forks, jack up the bike so that the front end hangs free and install a zip tie around the fork tube. Push it down so that it contacts the dust cover. Then lower the bike, level it with blocks under the rear of the swingarm, and gently climb on, assume riding position, and climb off. Then raise the bike again with the front end hanging free. Measure the distance from zip tie to dust cover and record the number. Label it FLS (free laden sag).

If you're using a fender, install it and repeat the exercise above. If laden sag with fender (label it LSF) is over 3 mm. less than FLS (that's a personal standard, you may be more tolerant, and yes the pun's intended), shim or bend to relieve pressure. If you're using a fork stabilizer alone or with fender, do the above and file, bend, shim or do whatever needs to be done to keep forks from sticking. As an example, with the Daytona fork stabilizer I have to attach two layers of electrical tape to the middle piece to keep the fork sliders from being pulled together and creating a bind. Just that little bit of plastic tape makes a 10 mm. difference in laden sag.
 
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I like this style of fork brace, and this brand as well (ATK). This one I put on my '78 I bought years ago for my SR500. Turns out that bike was so small and light, it didn't need a brace. Since the forks are virtually the same on the two bikes, it fit my 650 .....

ATK Fork Brace.jpg


Unfortunately, they don't make these anymore but there are similar ones available. The only issue is the cost, about $100. But the ATKs pop up on eBay from time to time. So far I've scored two for about $40 each. Sometimes they don't look real good, lol, like this one I picked up for my '83 .....

ATKForkBrace.jpg


But being alloy, they polish back up pretty easily .....

ATKForkBraceAfter2.jpg


ATKForkBrace83-3.jpg


They were made in several sizes and being so old, many times the seller doesn't know what they fit. I can provide you with the measurements you'll need the seller to verify if you like.
 
The bike looks pretty decent. A 77D. It is half way thru a harness swap. He used pieces from three bikes. It has 35mm forks but the top triple clamp "seemed" like it was different from mine. The rearsets were built using cut down and modified shift and brake lever. Owner installed a "carb rebuild kit" and I didn't have the heart to tell him his blued ( new out of the box) Kerker 2 into 1 suggests maybe he didn't rejet. The top end has been gone through but I wonder how the bottom end is with no way of knowing or assuming miles. Fresh paint on frame and tank (with small damage) looks good. My impulse is to walk. Really nice guy though.
 
I'd be worried about damaging the top of the fork legs with the clamp on aluminium types, the aluminium around the seal area is very, very thin, and quite brittle. Personally, I'd go for the steel hoop type.
 
Been on there since way before I owned madness and that's over ten years. Gratuitous live ferry shot lol
 

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