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Featured New Banana Girder Build

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by wrmdovr, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    Hello All......Just wanted to share the completed bike. I started on this project one year ago knowing that with the long rainy winters in the Pacific Northwest I should be able to complete it in time to ride in the largest bike event here in the north west....The Oyster Run. The end result is a drop-seat rigid with 4 1/2 inches ground clearance, banana girder front-end, internal twist throttle, modified side jockey shift, Kick-only, HHB PMA and Reg/Rec, PAMCO with a Joe Wiseguy 2 ointo 1 intake running a Harleyt 40mm CV carb. Everything is custom hand built by me with the exception of the tank, pegs, shocks and wheels/tires. The items that I feel really help make this a unique bike are obviously the front-end but also the headlight, which is an original 1910 boat light modified to run a LED lightbuld and I think compliments the front-end nicely. The leather grips on the handle bars and jockey shift where a real challenge but came out really nice tying to the leather seat. The rear-end radius frame supports....fills a negative space and provides structural support as well. I am happy to share any information or answer any questions as that is what I believe that is what makes this site so great....sharing information, experiences and encouraging others. Thanks.....
    WRMDOVR



    bike1.jpg bike3.jpg bike2.jpg
     
    bt24, BobbedSled, roadstar06 and 4 others like this.
  2. Travis

    Travis Staff Member Staff Member

    I love it! Did you build or buy the front-end?
     
    BigJimmyW13 likes this.
  3. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    Thank you......I hand fabricated everything on the bike, front-end, handlebars, frame, seat, leather work on seat and grips. I got the original idea from my daughters bicycle and then saw a picture of a motorcycle built by Dave Cook, which also inspired me for another build that i completed with a leaf-spring front-end.
    WRMDOVR
     
    BigJimmyW13 likes this.
  4. Travis

    Travis Staff Member Staff Member

    You have some serious skills. I love the lack of an upper triple tree. How does it handle? Have fun with it on your ride.
     
  5. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    The overall front-end is very uncluttered and i wanted to really try to emphasize that with the internal twist throttle and bar-end mirror, which the mount for was a pain. The only tools used in this build were a Harbor Freight bender, grinder, Lincoln 110v wirefeed welder, vise, dremel and the associated wrenches and sockets.
     
    BigJimmyW13 likes this.
  6. Travis

    Travis Staff Member Staff Member

    I've been looking into the design of that front-end. It looks like triumph used a similar design on some of their motorcycles in the 1920's. Probably not the most functional compared to anything modern, but very cool.
     
  7. I would love to see your daughter's bike that inspired this!

    Looks awesome!
     
  8. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    Hi Airwolfie.....here it is! :)

    insiration.jpg
     
  9. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    take particular note of the basket and ah-ooh-ga horn......which i tastefully omitted on my build! HA HA
     
    BigJimmyW13 likes this.
  10. ScottRod Customs

    ScottRod Customs XS650 Enthusiast

    Well done sir! I'm building a similar design this winter myself. Kudos!
     
  11. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    Hi ScottRod.....thank you. there are always a number of challenges and "surprises"......for me it was on the rear-end where I neglected to account for the chain placement......DOH! So after cursing myself I ended up putting in a durometer to direct the chain downward and carving out the inner part of the curved frame brace and all is good. Let us all know how it goes and good luck! WRMDOVR.
     
  12. ScottRod Customs

    ScottRod Customs XS650 Enthusiast

    Yeah, I would not have thought of that either. I was planning use a TC Bros. weld-on for mine. I love really strange and different front ends as well, and I'm not sure what I'll do there. Part of me wants to use the std. springer, but everybody has those! I have an old Schwinn that I restored/modded with that same springer as your daughter's bike. I always liked how Jesse Rooke uses bicycle elements in his builds, so being a bicycle nut, I will probably do the same to some extent.
     
  13. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    jesse rooke and dave cook are builders that i admire thier work and clearly influenced me and what i have done. i have a springer, leaf-spring and now banana girder, so the set is almost complete! :). Take a look at the springer that i built on my white bike and you will see a number of differences/nuances from the "standard" springer.....square stock turned on edge....handle bars integrated into the head so there are no triple trees, etc, My un-solicited recommendation is take a look at the various designs out there and then personalize it. My process is to build it strong and safe and then try to make it look pretty. Keep us posted and happy to provide any feedback or share any pitfalls that i ran/run into....like my chain placement! WRMDOVR
     
    BigJimmyW13 likes this.
  14. fredintoon

    fredintoon Fred Hill, S'toon.

    Hi wrmdovr,
    nor did you paint the bike pink. Mind you, the basket would have been handy to carry a 6-pack home in
    (trust me, carrying a 6-pack between your knees on the gas tank don't always work too well.)
    And that's a parp-parp horn. An ahooga horn is something entirely different.
     
    BigJimmyW13 likes this.
  15. I am blown away by your skills! Kudos on a beautiful machine.
    I know you are aware of this already, but keep a close eye on your chain guide wheel - being on the tight side of the chain it may be subject to quick wear. Not knocking you, just concerned for a fellow riders well being.
     
  16. fredintoon

    fredintoon Fred Hill, S'toon.

    Hi Spanky,
    The OP's post #11 says he put the chain guide wheel where it is to keep the chain's top run away from a frame tube.
    I share your concern about it's placement.
    If the guide wheel is bolted solid it's liable to wear out real quick.
    If the guide wheel is spring-loaded the chain will likely overcome the spring's resistance to pull itself straight and gnaw at the frame anyway.
     
  17. Fred, If you can't hold your beer, you shouldn't be drinking
     
    JRay77 likes this.
  18. fredintoon

    fredintoon Fred Hill, S'toon.

    Hi wrenchjohns,
    Quote from "Annie Get your Gun"
    "I can drink my liquor quicker than a flicker"
    "And I can get even sicker
    Than you."
    Which is why I bring my beer home while I'm sober and drink it sitting on the couch in front of the fireplace where I'm only ten steps away from the washroom.
    (At my age it's holding it in after it's been drunk that's the problem.)
     
  19. I s'pose I'll drink to that...cheers
     
  20. wrmdovr

    wrmdovr If it were easy.....everyone would do it!

    Hi Fred.....in all honestly my daughters bike was the inspriration. i did however consider sleaving the down tubes with little spigots at the bottom to dispense some jack daniels......next build!

    H i501Spanky.....i hear you and appreciate the concern.........once i realized my error in the assoicated ramificatoins i fabricated a mount that is fully adjustable and the durometer is purpose built specifically for this application, ie motorcycle chain guide, etc. that is the nice thing about building something if it doesnt work or needs adjusting or simply rebuilt i will fabricate something new.
    WRMDOVR
     

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