2003 Royal Enfield 500 Deluxe

Adamc

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For cold starts, my routine now is, key OFF, push choke lever down, throttle shut, two or three kicks to prime the engine, choke lever up, key ON, small amount of throttle, starts first kick nearly every time. Once the bike is warm, starts first kick without the rigmarôle.

Today, I was sure the carb moved as I pushed the choke. And again as I pulled it off. Yup, the carb has loosened off - might even explain why there's been more popping & banging on decel.

View attachment 246626


The manifold is just a short length of rubber tube - as well as engine vibration its got to cope with the carb wobbling about as we go over those well-maintained Borders potholes. Tightened the two manifold clamps - they were quite loose.

Took a run out to Bonchester Bridge to buy some fasteners for the XS - the wee Bullet seems to be running fine, think there was less back firing.

As for any bike with self-dismantling tendencies, will have to add another routine - regular end-to-end check & tighten fasteners.

All good fun though.
Hi Raymond
You could get a metal inlet tube fabricated?
Ads.
 

Raymond

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Hi Raymond
You could get a metal inlet tube fabricated?
Ads.

Don't think a metal tube would be a good idea - vibration and all that.

Have raised the issue on the Unofficial Royal Enfield Riders forum. One reply suggested a shorter manifold with a sort of backing plate:

manifold.JPG


This guy has also fitted munsen ring - I hadn't heard of it either - to support the filter.

The shorter manifold also gives a little bit more freedom for the throttle cable under the fuel tank - space is so tight it's all too easy to trap the cable putting the tank on.

A shorter manifold should in theory affect the tuning - low revving-engine needs long inlet tract etc - but I doubt it would make a helluva difference with this archaic plodder. I'm referring to the bike . . .
 

Raymond

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Getting the bike ready for MoT checked the electrics. To my surprise, front brake light not working. Rear brake lights it up, but not front and I know I made it work previously. The investigation didn't take very long - one of the wires from the switch had snapped where it goes into the harness. Bent the wire back to have a look, the insulation has gone totally brittle and its partner in crime is about the same.

PICT0746.JPG


Tried going down the route of replacing both wires but soon ran into problems - the switch is not considered to be repairable and that indeed proved to be the case - very small, plastic gone brittle. Drastic measures, or at least destroying the switch, were needed even to get the switch out.

PICT0747.JPG


Replacement now on order from Hitchcocks. Coulda bought one a couple of quid cheaper from a site in India but well, you know, uncertain delivery date, uncertain quality. Should be here in a day or two.

Meanwhile, see if I can get the pilot lights in the nacelle working before presenting the bike to the village m/c engineer.

Onwards and upwards.
 

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While waiting for the new brake light switch, managed to get the pilot lights to work. That's the two little lights above and to the side of the headlamp.

Gone back to filament bulbs - the LEDs I put in there have given up. Vibration or just shoddy bulbs.

Looks like this with side lights on.

PICT0750.JPG


I don't know the legal status of those pilot lights but I know that if they don't work, MoT tester is going to fail the bike.
 

RC4MAN

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Piece of cake Raymond with your skills and persistence.
This is what I'm currently dealing with, doing a partial restore of a 1995 HD Bad Boy Springer Softtail, this is the section of the harness that goes back to the tail and rear turn lamps, creative usage of scrap 4 color trailer wire :poo:
IMG_20230711_095941177.jpg
 

Raymond

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That is a mess. Have seen worse though - a Triumph TR6 I rebuilt a few years ago.

There was an upside - before the Triumph I was frightened of electrics and AFAP would avoid any electrical work. That bike was so dire there really was no alternative to rip out and start again.
 

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While waiting for the new brake light switch, managed to get the pilot lights to work. That's the two little lights above and to the side of the headlamp.

Gone back to filament bulbs - the LEDs I put in there have given up. Vibration or just shoddy bulbs.

Looks like this with side lights on.

View attachment 246864


I don't know the legal status of those pilot lights but I know that if they don't work, MoT tester is going to fail the bike.
Conversely, if NO lights are fitted, it can pass an MoT.
 

RC4MAN

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I'm not scared, or in the colloquial of the Southern US "I Ain't Skeered"
I made a lot of side money in my early 20's, the early 1970's, rewiring Triumph and Honda chopper builds and learned that DC wiring is a lot like plumbing, "goes into, goes outof" , I just hate to see people butcher stuff, it can be minimal and still neat and tidy, and make some kind of color sense.
 

Adamc

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While waiting for the new brake light switch, managed to get the pilot lights to work. That's the two little lights above and to the side of the headlamp.

Gone back to filament bulbs - the LEDs I put in there have given up. Vibration or just shoddy bulbs.

Looks like this with side lights on.

View attachment 246864


I don't know the legal status of those pilot lights but I know that if they don't work, MoT tester is going to fail the bike.
Like you Raymond I fell foul at the MOT station. Although MOT exempt I put The Old Girl through the test and it failed on the non-functional pilot light. Simple fix and better for safety I guess.
 

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Pardon my ignorance, but what is the pilot lights purpose?
Good question!

Well, as said above, I don't know the legal status of those pilot lights and I guess they're just a feature of the Enfield nacelle design. Certainly adds to the olde worlde charm of the bike?

But as also said above, I know that if they don't work, MoT tester is going to fail the bike.
 

46th Georgia

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My guess is it dates back to early carbide headlamps that ran off of acetylene. They used a "pilot light" iirc. Perhaps the light as well as the name was just a carryover?
Good question!

Well, as said above, I don't know the legal status of those pilot lights and I guess they're just a feature of the Enfield nacelle design. Certainly adds to the olde worlde charm of the bike?

But as also said above, I know that if they don't work, MoT tester is going to fail the bike.
Perhaps they just have a rule that if it's on there, it has to work. Our Federal Dept. of Trans. has that rule concerning commercial heavy duty trucks. One company I worked for let drivers customize their trucks a little with chrome, additional lights etc. Always a PIA because any added clearance light had to work.
 

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Good question!

Well, as said above, I don't know the legal status of those pilot lights and I guess they're just a feature of the Enfield nacelle design. Certainly adds to the olde worlde charm of the bike?

But as also said above, I know that if they don't work, MoT tester is going to fail the bike.
Goes back to the parking and sidelight regulations.
Remember when your Dad had to rig up a Wilmot Breedon sidelight on the driver's door if left parked in the street overnight in the 60s?
That's why. The W-B parking lamp was just one 4W bulb, instead of four sidelights being left on and draining the battery overnight. Batteries back then were almost universally crap.
The MoT regs insist if a parking lamp or sidelight is fitted, it must work - cars and bikes.
Hence why the 'daylight MoT'. A lamp that's not fitted cannot be tested and doesn't fail the test.
 

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Just thought an outline of the MoT test might be of interest?

Tester starts by checking details - number plate, frame number, mileage. Then goes on-line to the DVLA dB to confirm the bike's id. Mileage is recorded to show the bike's history and that it has not been 'clocked' so I get asked about the new speedo I fitted - replaces the km one originally fitted.

Usually gives the bike a good look over - it's amazing how an experienced tester homes in on anything not quite right.

Takes hold of and checks foot-pegs, seat, handlebar, levers, etc are firmly attached. Removes fuel cap and checks no leaks. With front wheel off the ground, spins the wheel and checks tyre for adequate tread depth, visible damage, splits, bulges, etc. Spoke damage & tightness, wheel bearings, excessive runout. Forks for lateral movement, smooth rotation. Checks correct operation of forks and no oil leaks. Similar for rear wheel, s/arm and rear shocks. Checks correct operation of all lights, including both brake lights. There is a dispensation for bikes manufactured before some date (1971?) when the front brake light became mandatory. Horn must give audible warning of approach - a rubber bulb horn would be adequate! Turn signals are not required but if fitted they must work. I'm not too sure if turn signals might be mandatory on some classes of bikes?

Checks the bike is straight - usually a long straight piece of metal placed against the wheels one side then the other.

Brakes are checked in various ways. Some testers fit a decelerometer and take the bike for a short ride. Others use a rolling road. They use combined weight of bike and rider to work out percentage efficiency of both brakes. The regs require at least 30% and 25% of combined weight and it doesn't matter which brake achieves the higher figure. Testers have told me that if a bike only just met the legal requirement, it would feel horribly under-braked. I don't think a bike with brakes on one wheel only would pass, but might be wrong. There must definitely be two independent braking systems.

The headlamp is checked for correct dipped beam - with a machine imaginatively called a beam checker.

No attention is given to the engine, except the exhaust must not be excessively loud. I'm sure they would pay attention if there was something dangerously wrong such as a really bad oil leak.

They always let you watch and often let you help, for example, push the rear down to lift the front wheel, or operating the lights and turn signals.

Costs just under £30. You are given a Pass or Fail document. Or both if there was a minor issue that could be corrected by adjustment, such as headlamp aim. For other failures such as tyre tread low, they usually give a free re-test if the bike is presented within one week - only that item is checked.

For serious failures, they can refuse to let you ride the bike away from the test centre. Don't know what the issue might be, maybe broken frame? It's never happened to me.
 
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Don't think a metal tube would be a good idea - vibration and all that.

Have raised the issue on the Unofficial Royal Enfield Riders forum. One reply suggested a shorter manifold with a sort of backing plate:

View attachment 246629


This guy has also fitted munsen ring - I hadn't heard of it either - to support the filter.

The shorter manifold also gives a little bit more freedom for the throttle cable under the fuel tank - space is so tight it's all too easy to trap the cable putting the tank on.

A shorter manifold should in theory affect the tuning - low revving-engine needs long inlet tract etc - but I doubt it would make a helluva difference with this archaic plodder. I'm referring to the bike . . .
Is a flat slide standard equipment on these, or is that an upgrade?
 
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