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Leslie

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That matt black headlamp, with the tango tank, looks proper that does.

Not too sure what you mean by your question about connectors. You have lots of options - Japanese-style bullets or perhaps multi-pin mini-connectors. Or is it a question about what wire connects to what?
The rev & speedo, are chrome, no markings on them but they look nice and more importantly they work, but if I get time I will Perouse eBay and chance my luck and buy the same kit in black
 

Leslie

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That matt black headlamp, with the tango tank, looks proper that does.

Not too sure what you mean by your question about connectors. You have lots of options - Japanese-style bullets or perhaps multi-pin mini-connectors. Or is it a question about what wire connects to what?
Raymond I have had problems trying to wire my new head light, the first thing is I cant test the unit as i dont have a multi tester, so i have gone in hoping the unit is good, the unit has 3 wires blue, red, & black fitted that I have fitted into a block, the wiring loom that is on the bike apparently a simplified jobbie has 4 wires brown with a white stripe, white, green and blue.

ignition on trying different combinations and absolutely nothing.
WL1.jpg
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WL5.jpg
 

Raymond

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Leslie, you sound like me a few years back - electrics definitely not my strong suit. But, I think you have no alternative to getting to grips with the bike's electrical system. You will need to trace those wires back - the white, brown/white, green blue. Two of them are likely to lead back to the dip switch on the l/h handlebar? Tracing back further, the dip switch is fed from the lights on/off switch on the r/h handlebar. The feed to the on/off switch should be live when the ignition is on, so if not trace that back further.

I find it very helpful to make sketches and notes on, well, I use A3 field drawing pads coz there's plenty of space. Get A3 pads cheap in The Works or Home Bargain stores or similar. It would be a good idea to get yourself a multimeter. When I bought one, I had no idea how to use it but they are simple devices and useful to check continuity, so you know your looking at two ends of the same wire.

The red, or it might be the blue, feeds main beam and the other feeds dip, and black is the common earth. Get it wrong, just swap the connectors.

Personally, wouldn't go with those chocolate block connectors. Go to somewhere like Vehicle Wiring Supplies online and you can buy Japanese style bullets - you need to buy male, female, plus male insulators and female insulators. They also have every colour of tracer wire and tons of other stuff. And of course other suppliers are out there. With the bullets, you also need a crimping tool and a good wire stripper will be handy. With a bit of practice, you can make good secure connections. With the plastic insulators, they are better protected against damp. Though, having said all that, looks like you're making a very neat job with those multi-connectors and heatshrink.

The apparent complexity of the bike's electrics starts to vanish as you trace the wiring out and gradually get an understanding. Or maybe you are already getting there and I should shut up? Good luck!
 

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Leslie, you sound like me a few years back - electrics definitely not my strong suit. But, I think you have no alternative to getting to grips with the bike's electrical system. You will need to trace those wires back - the white, brown/white, green blue. Two of them are likely to lead back to the dip switch on the l/h handlebar? Tracing back further, the dip switch is fed from the lights on/off switch on the r/h handlebar. The feed to the on/off switch should be live when the ignition is on, so if not trace that back further.

I find it very helpful to make sketches and notes on, well, I use A3 field drawing pads coz there's plenty of space. Get A3 pads cheap in The Works or Home Bargain stores or similar. It would be a good idea to get yourself a multimeter. When I bought one, I had no idea how to use it but they are simple devices and useful to check continuity, so you know your looking at two ends of the same wire.

The red, or it might be the blue, feeds main beam and the other feeds dip, and black is the common earth. Get it wrong, just swap the connectors.

Personally, wouldn't go with those chocolate block connectors. Go to somewhere like Vehicle Wiring Supplies online and you can buy Japanese style bullets - you need to buy male, female, plus male insulators and female insulators. They also have every colour of tracer wire and tons of other stuff. And of course other suppliers are out there. With the bullets, you also need a crimping tool and a good wire stripper will be handy. With a bit of practice, you can make good secure connections. With the plastic insulators, they are better protected against damp. Though, having said all that, looks like you're making a very neat job with those multi-connectors and heatshrink.

The apparent complexity of the bike's electrics starts to vanish as you trace the wiring out and gradually get an understanding. Or maybe you are already getting there and I should shut up? Good luck!
Raymond, I have used the big chunky connectors to allow easy identification of the connections, I have a disconnect block from good old Halfords, which I'm hoping to use once the cables have been sorted

block 1.jpg
 
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650Skull

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On The old light.................

Green is earth/ground

Brown/W is power to park light

White and Blue are high and low..................Not necessarily in that order.

To find out which is which make 2 jumper leads going from the battery negative and positive, then connect the negative to the green on the old light and power to both the white and then the blue to find which wires are high and low beam.

On the new light pull the plug off the back of the light to see if there is any indication between a ground/earth, (-) or positive, (+). if not assume the black is earth/ground and again test the blue and red wires from the positive jumper wire and look for high and low beam. .............If black isn't earth you will need to swap wires till you get the right one

Once you have sorted the wires between the 2 lights then match the loom wires, (blue and white), to the new light high/low wires,

Brown/W wire on the loom can be tied off/Blanked. Not needed




.
 

Jim

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"Ahh Jim Lad", sorry Jim if your not a pirates/privateers fan for the euphemism, have you got a reference for all the major torque values on the bike wheels frame anything and everything really
@5twins has a pretty comprehensive list of torques. Perhaps he'll be kind enough to put it up here.
 

5twins

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After studying the torque values given in all the manuals, I've found the chart given in the '77 manual to be about the best because all the values are given in ranges. Many of the other year listings are given as just single values. Having a range to work within is important for some items like the axles (because of their cotter pins) and the swingarm pivot bolt .....

77TorqueSpecs.jpg


There are a couple values in the chart I stray from, having found what I think are better specs for them from other years. For instance, I make the large acorn nuts on the head 28 instead of 25, and the countershaft sprocket nut I do up to about 90 - 95.
 

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On The old light.................

Green is earth/ground

Brown/W is power to park light

White and Blue are high and low..................Not necessarily in that order.

To find out which is which make 2 jumper leads going from the battery negative and positive, then connect the negative to the green on the old light and power to both the white and then the blue to find which wires are high and low beam.

On the new light pull the plug off the back of the light to see if there is any indication between a ground/earth, (-) or positive, (+). if not assume the black is earth/ground and again test the blue and red wires from the positive jumper wire and look for high and low beam. .............If black isn't earth you will need to swap wires till you get the right one

Once you have sorted the wires between the 2 lights then match the loom wires, (blue and white), to the new light high/low wires,

Brown/W wire on the loom can be tied off/Blanked. Not needed




.
Skull Raymond the issue was an earthing issue, now sorted thanks lads


headlight working 1.jpg
 

Leslie

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I really like the look of that headlamp. Can you share where it and the mounts are from?

Thanks,
Ted
Ted both items are from Alchemy of Biggleswade county Bedfordshire United Kingdom, www.alchemyparts.co.uk
They are not the cheapest but the products they sell are quality.
 

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Something to be aware of is if you get a caliper from a model that used 5mm thick discs, you will need to swap out the little retainers on the bracket for a 7mm disc to fit in .....

Anti-Squeal Shim.jpg


Anti-Squeal Shim2Modded.jpg
 

Leslie

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Something to be aware of is if you get a caliper from a model that used 5mm thick discs, you will need to swap out the little retainers on the bracket for a 7mm disc to fit in .....

View attachment 214286

View attachment 214287
Twins i have 7mm discs, but i have made equal (5mm) spacers as the offset form the disc fitted to my 650F was in negative offset and I can alter them accordingly once I try the wheel with the twin discs set up
clip 3.jpg
clip1.jpg
clip 2.jpg
 

Raymond

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You could of course run the bike with a single disc?

Here's Miss November:

PICT2573.JPG


Master cylinder is an ebay special Yamaha item with a smaller piston, one-piece braided steel line, ie no coupling, and an EBC drilled disc. As well as being drilled the EBC disc is thinner and a lot lighter than the manhole cover that was on there before. The m/c with smaller piston is one of the best changes I've made to the bike - with the original, the brake felt wooden wiv no feel. Now the brake feels pretty much how I like it.

This set up gives me plenty of brakes, certainly enough for how fast I ride . . .

Just a suggestion FWIW.
 

Leslie

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You could of course run the bike with a single disc?

Here's Miss November:

View attachment 214289


Master cylinder is an ebay special Yamaha item with a smaller piston, one-piece braided steel line, ie no coupling, and an EBC drilled disc. As well as being drilled the EBC disc is thinner and a lot lighter than the manhole cover that was on there before. The m/c with smaller piston is one of the best changes I've made to the bike - with the original, the brake felt wooden wiv no feel. Now the brake feels pretty much how I like it.

This set up gives me plenty of brakes, certainly enough for how fast I ride . . .

Just a suggestion FWIW.
I like the twin disc set up, The single disc would be ample for my style of riding, it is purely down to aesthetics, my last project XS650 I went the whole hog, fireblade front end Kawasaki swing arm Ohlins shocks, this time I am staying within the design periphery of 70s Yamaha's .
 
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