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A long, long project.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by toglhot, Jun 20, 2020.

  1. Mailman

    Mailman Hardly a Guru Top Contributor

    What is the black finish on your pipes? Is it a high temp spray paint?
     
  2. Bewarethemoon

    Bewarethemoon XS650 Junkie XS650.com Supporter Top Contributor

    I’m bloody loving this build!

    The engine’s looking awesome, I love the black barrels & crank cases!

    Daniel.
     
  3. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    Adelaide
  4. fredintoon

    fredintoon Fred Hill, S'toon. Top Contributor

    Hi Daniel,
    yeah, black is the new aluminum.
    When we were teenagers us old farts used to paint our cast iron heads and barrels with aluminum paint
    so that folks would think we rode aluminum-engined race-bikes.
     
    Bewarethemoon likes this.
  5. Bewarethemoon

    Bewarethemoon XS650 Junkie XS650.com Supporter Top Contributor

    I like that Fredintoon!

    I’m going to have my head & barrels coated in a heat dissipating ceramic coating which is conveniently black!
     
    Scripto VU likes this.
  6. bosco659

    bosco659 XS650 Addict XS650.com Supporter

    Looks fantastic! Great job on the pipes. I’m guessing they were mandrel bent.
     
  7. fredintoon

    fredintoon Fred Hill, S'toon. Top Contributor

    hi Daniel,
    my '84 XS650 Heritage special left the factory with it's engine blacked out but with the head & barrel fins edges polished back to bare aluminum,
    presumably to let folks know they weren't cast iron. Even today the head has only faded to a dark grey and the barrels are still black.
     
  8. Bewarethemoon

    Bewarethemoon XS650 Junkie XS650.com Supporter Top Contributor

    That’s exactly what I want to replicate, I love that look!
     
  9. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    In lieu of a single point cam, which aren't available anymore, I tried my hand at making one on my lathe. I don't have a mill, so I used a vertical slide on the cross slide with a endmill in the chuck. Unfortunately, I cut the keyway in the wrong place. Tried it out today with the key removed and the cam just bolted in place. It worked well with static timing, lines on the rotor lining up spot on. Next job is to get the keyway right, might be easier to cut the keyway first and then machine the two ramps. Of course only timing with a light will show up any discrepancies, but statically the ramps are exactly 180 degrees apart with exactly the same lift. Yes I know you can buy electronic ignitions, but where's the fun in that, anyone can do that! The good news is, I've bought a mill, should be here in the next week or so, that'll make things a lot easier.
     

    Attached Files:

    Mailman, gggGary, GLJ and 1 other person like this.
  10. fredintoon

    fredintoon Fred Hill, S'toon. Top Contributor

    Hi toglhot,
    simpler yet to cut another keyway?
     
  11. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    Adelaide
    More work on the ignition system today. Couldn't find any 3mm eye terminals anywhere, so modified some male blade terminals. Grommet in the points housing was spit, so I used some rubber I had lying around and fashioned a new one, then fashioned a points backing plate and mounted points and condenser. I'm thinking of exiting the points to coil wire at the top of the housing a little later on to make it a little neater. I replaced the 4mm phillips head screws securing the points and condenser with allen heads and shortened some 6mm socket, button heads for fixing the backing plate in place. The cutouts on the plate are a little longer than stock which gives me a little more leeway for timing. Still have to make another cam, but I'll wait until my new mil arrives before tackling that. Once it arrives I'll have to ignore the bike for a while while I make a stand for it.
     

    Attached Files:

    gggGary, Bewarethemoon and Jim like this.
  12. Rasputin

    Rasputin XS650 Addict XS650.com Supporter Top Contributor

    Astounds me why Yamaha didn’t do that initially. Even my 1967 CD175 has that system. Could you utilise a cam from on of those engines?
    Happy new Milling machine.
     
    Jim likes this.
  13. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    A lot of things on the XS650 astound me, I think it was an overnight design, put together quickly to capitalise on the success of the Brit 650 twins.
     
  14. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    When I converted to a permanent magnet alternator on the bike, rather than buy a kit, I pieced it together using a Virago rotor, a Banshee, stator and a mount I spun up on my lathe. This left no way to time it, so today I shaped a simple crescent shaped plate, drilled and tapped a couple of holes in the left side engine cover and mounted the plate on the inside to get it close to the rotor. To get the timing right, I installed the original rotor and stator, brought the rotor around around to line up with the F mark on the stator, then carefully disassembled the old alternator, assembled the new PMA rotor and scribed a line on the rotor to line up with the middle of the cutout on the bottom of the cover. Once done I assembled the timing plate in the side cover and engraved a line on the plate to line up with the rotor line. Hopefully it's right and the motor, without plugs, didn't rotate any. If so, it's a simple matter of engraving another line on the plate.
     

    Attached Files:

    Grimly, Rasputin, gggGary and 2 others like this.
  15. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    Adelaide
    Cranked up the new mill for its first job today: A single point cam. Tuned down a bit of round stock to 18mm on the lathe, bored an 8mm hole through the centre, milled a couple of flats 180 degrees apart on the mill, filed the edges round for a smooth ramp, mounted it on the lathe again and cut a 2mm keyway, then polished it up. After finishing I mounted it on the bike and did a static time, as it turned out, backing points plate is dead centre in the mounting screws, so plenty of leeway for timing with a light. Next project, an electronic ignition. I have all the parts so I'll assemble on a breadboard to check. Couldn't find a 100PF electrolytic so replaced that with a ceramic. If it works I'll make a printed circuit board, mill an aluminium box for the parts, then mill a magnetic rotor and make a second circuit board for the hall effect sensor. I've decided to mount the hall effect sensor behind the points cover and run two leads to the aluminium heat sink box containing the other bits and mount it on the frame next to the coil. This'll give me three ignition systems to choose from: Twin points and single point systems and an electronic system. Why so many? Well, they say you can never have too many bikes, I don't have the room nor enough time left for multiple bikes, so, I limit myself to multiple systems. Whilst I have a lot of experience with electrical systems, my electronics experience is limited to just a few simple projects: Digital voltmeters and what not, so, it'll be interesting to see if this electronic system I cobble together will actually work.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 16, 2020
    GLJ and Rasputin like this.
  16. Rasputin

    Rasputin XS650 Addict XS650.com Supporter Top Contributor

    Great job, looks very neat.
     
  17. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    Here's a tip for those doing the PMA conversion. As you probably know the keyway in the rotor is 5mm, whereas the keyway in the crank is 4mm. To marry them together you have to reduce the section of the 5mm woodruff key that fits into the crank keyway down to 4mm. 5mm woodruff keys have a different diameter than 4mm woodruff keys, so, the woodruff key doesn't reach the bottom of the crank keyway. To fix I turned some stock down the 13mm, the diameter of the crank keyway, then cut it in half, I then milled the the key to a depth of 5.12 mm, then milled .5mm off either side of the key that fits into the crank, leaving a 5mm section of key sitting proud of the crank to locate the key in the rotor. To help with assembly (key always seems to drop out when trying to locate the rotor), I milled the key a little larger than 4mm so it wouldn't fall out when fixing the rotor in place. I did file a key originally, but the finish wasn't up to scratch so I decided to use the mill. Difficult to set up, but worth it in the end.
     

    Attached Files:

    Jim, Signal and Rasputin like this.
  18. bosco659

    bosco659 XS650 Addict XS650.com Supporter

    Very nice work. Wonder why the rotor wasn’t machined with a 4mm key way?
     
  19. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    The rotor isn't standard equipment for the XS65,it's a standard fitting for the
    banshee, obviously the Banshee has a 5mm keyway in the crank
     
  20. toglhot

    toglhot XS650 Enthusiast

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    Sitting around in the workshop the sidecove was starting to look a little dull. First time I polished it I decided to leave the war wounds as a right of passage, this time, stuff the cover's rights, I removed them as best I could. The Yamaha inspection plate was badly wounded, so I spent a bit of time on the nylon fibre wheel removing them, unfortunately I couldn't remove the one between the H and the A without making it more obvious, so left well enough alone. I even polished up the timing plate I made and blasted the recess for the inspection plate. The aluminium mouldings leave a lot to be desired, thousands of tiny pin pricks, impossible to remove, so staining is evident if you look close.
     

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    Rasputin, bosco659 and Jim like this.

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