1977 XS650

Yes, the starter sounds pretty normal to me too. Hey, at least it's not popping out of engagement or grinding like many of them do, lol.

I replace those fork dust seals with gaiters. I like the "look" and they offer more protection for the seals and tubes. Also, they are very reasonably priced if you use the boots made for truck shocks .....

78GaitersBrace.jpg


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Today's update. I decided to try to rebuild the tach so I removed it and am now waiting for a little prying tool to undo the crimped edge. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't a little nervous about that, but If I take it slow it looks doable. I also took off the forks in anticipation of that job. I loosened the cap fine (after a little bit of straining). Saying a few prayers about those bottom bolts. I'm going to need a deep allen for the one side (or cut one down and use an 8mm socket on the other end). I did try my impact driver on the side with the clamp, but it seems like it is on there pretty darn tight. I have them both turned upside down and soaking the bottom bolts in PB blaster over night. I figure that I will try to heat them up tomorrow before giving the impact driver another go.
 
Agree with Jim here. Retorque of the heads is never a bad idea. You can't see them in your photo of the oil tube, but just behind the tube and just below the head are two bolts that secure the cam chain tensioner. If these loosen up they will make a mess on the front of the engine.
Interestingly enough, mine hadn’t been run for years , first shakedown, I had an oil leak …returned home, but couldn’t find it once I cleaned it up
Has not leaked since …I don’t know, perhaps it just was lack of use
All head bolts to spec
 
Forks are disassembled and cleaned 🙌. Just need the new seals to show up in the mail. Removing the old seals involved more swearing than I anticipated. Ended up making a bit of a dog's breakfast of them, but got them out and that is all that really matters. Also waiting for a tool to undo the crimp on the tach in the background of the shot.
 

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How did you get that bottom bolt out of the damper rods without them spinning? Did you make up a special tool or something? If not, you're probably going to need to for the install so you can hold them as you torque the bottom bolt.
 
How did you get that bottom bolt out of the damper rods without them spinning? Did you make up a special tool or something? If not, you're probably going to need to for the install so you can hold them as you torque the bottom bolt.
I left fluid in them and clamped in bench vice. I was able to get them just started with an 8mm allen and a long breaker bar (I cut an old allen key to make a straight bar and used an 8mm socket on the other end). Once they moved a little, I used the impact driver to get them the rest of the way out. I've had surprisingly good luck, on other forks I've worked on, using an old wooden broom handle that I've cut a taper into. I don't know if it will work with this one, but I figure it is worth a shot. If it doesn't, I'm prepared to come up with something. I've seen the cut 17mm socket, the oval'ed pipe, the slotted rod, and the long rod with a flattened end. Haven't decided if I'll go with one of those or MacGyver some other method. I'll scratch my head about it while I wait for the seals to show up :D
 
The hose clamp thing is a great idea, thanks for the tip :thumbsup: Often the ring is no longer as beautiful after it has been opened, but this should largely prevent this. However, the ring usually can't stand this more than once, the second time it tears quickly or at least you'll see deformations. Depending on what you want to do to the instruments, there is also a method that is gentler on the visible parts:

Instr-2.jpg


Another advantage is that repeated opening becomes very easy. You can find some details here, simply run the text through the translator : )
 
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The hose clamp thing is a great idea, thanks for the tip :thumbsup: Often the ring is no longer as beautiful after it has been opened, but this should largely prevent this. However, the ring usually can't stand this more than once, the second time it tears quickly or at least you'll see deformations. Depending on what you want to do to the instruments, there is also a method that is gentler on the visible parts:
I picked up on the hose clamp too and got one today before I started. I've got it back together. The last two pics are the re-crimp and back in its housing - not perfect, but I'm still pretty pleased with the result. The problem was pretty self evident as there was a big blob of a sticky transparent resin on the cup (old lubricant 🤷‍♂️ ). i cleaned it all as good as I could with acetone on q-tips and I think it is working now. The first pic is what I came up with to hold the fork damper when reassembly time comes. I didn't have a pipe of the right diameter to do the oval'ed pipe method, but by ovaling this one and cutting notches out of the curved ends it will act sort of like the 17mm socket method.
 

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I picked up on the hose clamp too and got one today before I started. I've got it back together. The last two pics are the re-crimp and back in its housing - not perfect, but I'm still pretty pleased with the result. The problem was pretty self evident as there was a big blob of a sticky transparent resin on the cup (old lubricant 🤷‍♂️ ). i cleaned it all as good as I could with acetone on q-tips and I think it is working now. The first pic is what I came up with to hold the fork damper when reassembly time comes. I didn't have a pipe of the right diameter to do the oval'ed pipe method, but by ovaling this one and cutting notches out of the curved ends it will act sort of like the 17mm socket method.
I just looked at my last post and I guess the forum decided to re-order them. The numbers are in sequence for when they were taken so 4013 and 4014 are the re-crimp and obviously 4008 is the fork tool.
 
Great, this turned out very nice!

Have you already checked the speedometer for functionality? The sticky stuff wasn't leaked damper oil from the magnet housing after the instrument was stored upside down for a long time?
 
Great, this turned out very nice!

Have you already checked the speedometer for functionality? The sticky stuff wasn't leaked damper oil from the magnet housing after the instrument was stored upside down for a long time?
Speedo was working fine when I had it out for test ride last week. I don’t think it was stored upside down ever.
 
I should have linked you guys to this thread where we discussed this topic recently. Most hose clamps have a couple little "bumps" under the screw and those will dent the ring unless you provide some padding. See post #19 for my solution .....

https://www.xs650.com/threads/speedometer-and-tachometer-rebuild.410/
After I finished, I realized you had something in there. I wrapped mine with multiple layers of electrical tape to cushion it and was careful not to tighten it too much. I also didn’t try to un-crimp on the side with the “bumps” and rotated the hose clamp as i worked my way around. One other thing, i had to sharpen my paint can key with my dremel to get it under the edge.
 
For the second part of my un-crimp, i had a pair of needle nose pliers that i accidentally broke one tip off years ago. It ended up working perfectly to use the short end on the inside and it allowed the longer end to bear flat against the outside face of the hose clamp.
 
Fork seals and dust boots arrived today so I've got her back on her feet. I was a little surprised that I needed to loosen the upper triple clamp, but the rubber bushing between the headlight ears and the upper triple was squished out of alignment so after a few failed attempts to get it aligned, I decided it was better to just undo the bolt and it made it a lot easier. Tomorrow I'll finish getting the tach and headlight back on. just in time for the return of rain 🤨.
 

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These forks work much better with slightly more than the stock amount of oil (about 5.7oz.) in them. I go about 6.5 oz., 7 if the forks were stripped and totally cleaned out (really, truly empty). Or you can use the old tried and true method of setting the oil level 6" from the tops of the tubes with the springs out, forks fully compressed. That will result in about 6.75 oz. of oil in there.
 
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