Interesting motorcycles, not XS650

MrBultaco

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1960 Speed Twin
 

Mailman

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I remember reading about that model years ago, nicknamed bathtubs. They were designed to be a motorcycle that a businessman could ride to work and stay clean , protected from rain and road spray. I can’t remember now, but may have had an enclosed chain as well? Anyways they were a sales disaster in the USA and most dealerships removed and discarded the front fender and rear “bathtub” and replaced them with chrome fenders for a more traditional appearance. Finding a nice one intact is pretty rare these days and they are considered quite collectible.
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2XSive

At least one screw loose behind the handle bars
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From Dale's Machines through time: 1917 Harley-Davidson Messenger Pigeon Carrier - This machine was used in the movie "The Spirit of St. Louis" after its use in WWI. Subsequently, it was bought by Steve McQeen without the Pigeon Carrier attachement. Dale found the machine in 1984 and then in 2003, he found the pigeon carrier attachment. When they put them together, everything fit perfect, and there were actually parts from the exact motorcycle hidden inside the carrier wagon. Pictured here is the left and right side of the machine.
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Raymond

likes to play with old motorbikes
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. . . they were a sales disaster in the USA and most dealerships removed and discarded the front fender and rear “bathtub” and replaced them with chrome fenders for a more traditional appearance . . .
The bathtub was not a sales hit in the UK either. A bit 'Marmite' - you either like it or you hate it. Not enough people liked the full enclosure.
 

Mailman

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The bathtub was not a sales hit in the UK either. A bit 'Marmite' - you either like it or you hate it. Not enough people liked the full enclosure.

I doubt I would’ve liked it back then, but now I think they have vintage charm and distinctive look that I’m kinda fond of. 🙂
 

Raymond

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They languished in dealer showrooms, very limited lock to lock, and a riding position that no one would put up with "back in the day" and well, can you say CB750?
That is so true. It's been said so many times but the buyer in the early '70s faced the choice of spending his hard-earned on some tarted-up old tat or buying a fast, reliable, sophisticated, CB750 or Z1 which didn't leak oil.
 

Grewth

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Back in the day, a working class bloke could possibly build up that Norton cafe racer in the garden shed.
Might take a couple of years, but it was achievable.
As for the new type, well maybe I could remortgage my house ?
 

Grewth

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This was when the BSA group started to experience the dark side of Edward Turner. The 3TA was the first in the range, nobody thought to harden the TS journal on the crank for the first 750 bikes with predictable results.
Even when that was fixed, you still had a primary chain running between two fixed centres with no tensioner at all.
When Turner designed the C15, he ordered it into production with no prototypes built or tested.
Not really surprising that the British industry failed with idiots like that running it
 

teamWicked

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This was when the BSA group started to experience the dark side of Edward Turner. The 3TA was the first in the range, nobody thought to harden the TS journal on the crank for the first 750 bikes with predictable results.
Even when that was fixed, you still had a primary chain running between two fixed centres with no tensioner at all.
When Turner designed the C15, he ordered it into production with no prototypes built or tested.
Not really surprising that the British industry failed with idiots like that running it
And, the vast boomer market in North America was just stepping out and the likes of the simple,easy to ride Honda Cub (step through 50) was reliable and oil tight.
 

gggGary

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The myth of early Japanese bikes being oil tight is just that, a myth.
They may not leak as MUCH and it's a different location but nearly every iron sleeved aluminum engine cylinder will start leaking at the joints over time.
All those "oil tight Honda 750s" have an oil, dirt drool blob running down the front.' Left long enough and it becomes a river just like some twins you might have experience with. Doing a round of bolt tightening on those Hondas a much bigger chore. Those long intricate cylinder head covers found on about every UJM another favorite oil drool site.

Well gotta go kick the norton through a few dozen times, get the oil out of the sump and back in the oil tank. :cautious:


:p
 
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