Lucille pulls another one on me....

Paul Sutton

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Thank you TM regarding Silicone. I have the thin spray stuff for locks and the thick vacuum grease for plastics and electrics. I had a voltmeter that lasted 2 startups. I bet the inductive spike from the rotor got to it. When testing my rotor by measuring its current drain I was surprised how big the induced spark was when I removed my temporary power wire. So I installed a diode across the brushes in a similar manner to TM. Here is his thread on the topic:
http://www.xs650.com/threads/alternator-rotor-inductive-kickback.42605/#post-425493
Thank you again TM.
 

TwoManyXS1Bs

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...Dielectric grease is an insulator. It stops electrons better than it stops water...

Yes, that's the idea. Protects connectors from the elements, and prevents electrons from escaping their cages, to wander off and create electrolysis, and other carnage.

Definitely avoid conductive greases.
http://www.w8ji.com/dielectric_grease_vs_conductive_grease.htm

With non-moving high friction/pressure contacts, like bullet and spade connectors, the metal-to-metal electrical contact is assured even when drenched in dielectric grease.

Also works well with sliding contacts, like rotating ignition, headlight, and turn signal switches.

Not so with flat-faced landing contacts, like points and relay contactors.
Don't use it there.

Been in standard use for a long time, like with old vacuum-tube TV sets.
The early contact dopes (before silicone) predate me.
GeneralCementContactDope.jpg

Standard automotive use since the '80s, especially in the firewall bulkhead connectors.

If the environment is dry and sterile, it's not needed. If the contacts are lightly loaded, and handle low voltages and currents, it's not recommended. Absolutely keep it away from avionics trays and their edge/pin connectors.

Google "dielectric grease spark plug" for application info...
 
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TwoManyXS1Bs

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Riding a bike with a hot engine, then hitting rain and water, the rapid cooling can pull moisture into trapped spaces. Take the XS650 to the carwash, and spray the engine before it's cooled. Roll it out, dry it off, then pull the points and advancer covers. There'll be some condensation in there.

Spark plug caps also get hot, and have trapped air, which can pull moisture into the caps when rapidly cooled.
PlugCap01.jpg PlugCap02.jpg

The rubber boots are supposed to prevent moisture entrainment. The dielectric grease ensures the seal...
 

5twins

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Yes, when I put dielectric grease on my spark plug wire ends, I also run it up the sides of the wire on the insulation about 3/4". Then the rubber boot slides down onto it and I figure this gives me a double seal (rubber boot and silicone grease). I also put a little on the end of the cap or coil where the rubber boot fits onto.
 

jetmechmarty

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With the exception of spark plug boots, I am, and shall remain a staunch contrarian to the use of dielectric grease.

Bullet connectors are engineered to be a one use item. Ford wants me to buy a new car in less than 10 years. In our hobby, that stuff will bring grief.

Rather than carry on a lengthy discussion, I respectfully disagree with its use based upon my own knowledge and experience.
 

MaxPete

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Sorry, I don't.
Hi Jim & Bosco:

I actually found the clips on my phone and now, three and half years later, I have figured out how to post videos on YouTube - so I went back and added them to the first post in this thread as well as to Bosco’s thread on his snazzy new bike.

Pete
 

YamadudeXS650C

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Hi Jim & Bosco:

I actually found the clips on my phone and now, three and half years later, I have figured out how to post videos on YouTube - so I went back and added them to the first post in this thread as well as to Bosco’s thread on his snazzy new bike.

Pete
I remember the day I figured out how to post on YOUTUbe. It took a whole evening of dedicated concentrated effort, but well worth it.

"The XS650 Dance"

 

YamadudeXS650C

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I really like that bike in the video.. I think my XS2 dances faster backwards than that though.

Thanks for the compliment of my '75 survivor.

I suspect that the speed of reverse trajectory has an inverse relationship to the degree of accuracy of carburetor synchronization ;).

.
 

jetmechmarty

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We should also figure into the equation the angle of declination of the driveway in question; as I recall, the concrete portion of mine was poured with something like 3 degrees built in for rain runoff.
Mine goes backwards inside the garage where the floor is somewhat level. (or supposed to be)
 
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