Knives and other things

Mailman

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I’ve had a small bunch of knives that I’ve been hanging on to for most of my life and I decided to get them out, clean them up, dig up whatever info on them I could find and give them to my oldest son……so he can throw them in a drawer and forget about them. 😆 But I had some fun doing this and thought the history was interesting.

First up my trusty old Buck Model 110 folding lock blade knife. Introduced in 1964, it is considered to be the most popular knife of all time, selling over 15 million of them. This was my every day carry knife when I was young and working construction. Bought in 1974, I was hard on this knife and it has the scars to prove it, the sheath has…ummm…patina, but it is still in pretty good condition.
IMG_9361.jpeg


Next up is Schrade Uncle Henry locking blade with rosewood handles. From 1983, it was a gift and I never used it. It was made in the USA. In 2004, Schrade sold the company. You can still buy a Schrade Uncle Henry knife, but these days it’s made in China.
IMG_9362.jpeg

These two knives were given to me by my grandfather when I was a young boy in the early 60’s. They were inexpensive at the time , the kind of pocket knives you would find in a glass case in an old hardware store. And since my grandfather was a farmer in a small town in Missouri, I’m sure that’s exactly where he bought them.
Surprisingly there are several knife forums and knife collectors are interested in these old knives, even though they aren’t worth a whole lot. The large one is made by Sabre, an old Ohio company, the knife was made in Japan, it was an early model of a long running design called a Barlow ( that’s a style that is sold across other brands of knives ) it has sawed bone handles. It’s still sharp but has had some corrosion.
The smaller knife is from the Imperial Schrade knife co. A model called the Peanut. I wore that knife out carrying it in my pocket , clear up through high school, back in a time when most boys carried a pocket knife and wouldn’t get kicked out of school and had the police called on them, just for carrying one.
IMG_9363.jpeg


So anybody else got any good old knives thrown in a tool box or night stand drawer? 🤔 I’d be interested in seeing them!
 

Adamc

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I’ve had a small bunch of knives that I’ve been hanging on to for most of my life and I decided to get them out, clean them up, dig up whatever info on them I could find and give them to my oldest son……so he can throw them in a drawer and forget about them. 😆 But I had some fun doing this and thought the history was interesting.

First up my trusty old Buck Model 110 folding lock blade knife. Introduced in 1964, it is considered to be the most popular knife of all time, selling over 15 million of them. This was my every day carry knife when I was young and working construction. Bought in 1974, I was hard on this knife and it has the scars to prove it, the sheath has…ummm…patina, but it is still in pretty good condition.
View attachment 254804

Next up is Schrade Uncle Henry locking blade with rosewood handles. From 1983, it was a gift and I never used it. It was made in the USA. In 2004, Schrade sold the company. You can still buy a Schrade Uncle Henry knife, but these days it’s made in China.
View attachment 254805
These two knives were given to me by my grandfather when I was a young boy in the early 60’s. They were inexpensive at the time , the kind of pocket knives you would find in a glass case in an old hardware store. And since my grandfather was a farmer in a small town in Missouri, I’m sure that’s exactly where he bought them.
Surprisingly there are several knife forums and knife collectors are interested in these old knives, even though they aren’t worth a whole lot. The large one is made by Sabre, an old Ohio company, the knife was made in Japan, it was an early model of a long running design called a Barlow ( that’s a style that is sold across other brands of knives ) it has sawed bone handles. It’s still sharp but has had some corrosion.
The smaller knife is from the Imperial Schrade knife co. A model called the Peanut. I wore that knife out carrying it in my pocket , clear up through high school, back in a time when most boys carried a pocket knife and wouldn’t get kicked out of school and had the police called on them, just for carrying one.
View attachment 254806

So anybody else got any good old knives thrown in a tool box or night stand drawer? 🤔 I’d be interested in seeing them!
Great thread Bob, I will have a rummage and see………
 

Jan_P

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I remembered one knife I have kept
German Solingen which is a good brand --- I Believe it is intended for Scouting
Send signals of Bayonet style + have Leather holder.
Bought in a department store mid or late 60 ies by my Father given to me.

The upper chromed end is flat on the backside and has been used for hitting something small nails possibly
Has been resharpened And the blade is Black if i recall right for smearing out Permatex Gasket Cement.
In the 70 ies
Could have polished it ..
Not seen for sale in 50 years Don t believe it is possible to find.

Not seen much use otherwise.

Switchblades was and is not much used professionally Those with a spring activated mechanism was illegal if i recall right.

Today you are not allowed to carry a knife in public places if you cannot give an explanation for having it on you.
If you are working and need it or are going fishing or so.
But the law is mostly used when other crimes has happened as in drug related or fighting.
And the Police have other reasons to ask questions.




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Looking for the knife I found things I have forgotten I have the one below I did know i had
The other thing is not Motorcycle related even though it looks as a gas handle for heavy handed riders
And it is not a hammer either .. Perhaps never seen in the USA

The other thing to the right is a thing where you put a pencil ( Or sharp hardened point ..don't know the English word ) and draw a line line parallel to an edge

IMAG0253.jpg
 

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toglhot

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I have a few:
The one on the left is a flick knife I bought when stationed in Malaysia. Pretty useless really, but I bought it just to see how they worked. Terrible edge and ilegal in 0z.

Second from left is a stainless folder, looks nice, but again terrible Edge.

The next two are from China from memory.. These are bloody good follders: Terrific edge, more like razor blades. Seem to hold their edge and are easy to sharpen.

Second last one is a steak knife, the wife uses it to cut my dinner.

Last one is a fat handle knife. They sell them in mobility shops to old folks like me who need their wives to cut up their dinner. I use it the skin the butter and spread it on my bread.

I used to make knives from old leaf springs back in the 80s. Using coke in various forges and blowers I made during my blacksmithing phase. All lost along the way, unfortunately. I did sell a few customs along the way. I made a few double edged, balanced throwing knives, never mastered the art of throwing them though.

Mostly I made Bowies, bloody big ones. I made one around 15" long, it had an aluminium handle and a brass guard and bugle head screws and nuts holding the handle in place. It was hollow ground and had the tempering colours running through the polished blade, it looked the business, but it did have a very slight curve, compliments of uneven hammering. Unfortunately, being carbon steel it tended to rust, so, didn't hold it's shine for long, and ended up just being another rusty tool in my workshop. No idea what happened to it, lost somewhere in our travels.
 

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Mailman

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I’ll tell you a couple I wish I had…….
My father was stationed in the Philippines towards the end of WW2, then as soon as Japan surrendered, he was shipped to Japan with the first occupation troops to oversee the surrender.
All the Japanese soldiers had to turn over all their guns and knives. The American troops were allowed one of each, pistols, rifles, swords and bayonets to send back home.
My father had an absolutely beautiful Japanese officers sword and a wicked long bayonet. They were unfortunately sold decades later, but they looked like these.
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And here is a photo of my Dad posing with his sword when he returned home from the war. Trying to look menacing. 😄
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toglhot

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In the armed services it is mandatory to take a picture of oneself with a gun, best if you can manage a scary look. I never had one taken, most people think I look scary enough without one.
It has been said my face would scare anything!
 

toglhot

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I saw a few pics of my old man when he served in WW2. He never posed with his. Gun though, probably all too real for him.

He suffered from his war days, often waking at night telling my mother hsi dead men were marching again.

He often joked about the services, seems they sent him to train in the jungles in far NQ, then shipped him off to the desert in Tobruk. When he got used to that, they shipped him off to fight in the Jungles of New Guinea.

He was promoted in the field, rising to the rank of SGT. A member of the 2/28th battalion, raised in Perth, who were not looked upon favourably at the time, all, apparently, bad boys, inclined to drinking and bad behaviour.

He served at El Alamein, Tobruk, Palestine, Borneo, Lae, Finschhafen, Morotai, Busu River, Labuan and all through New Guinea. An original Rat of Tobruk, he never spoke of the war, unless asked, but never missed the ANZAC Day march, a chance to see his mates that lived through it I guess.

I learn't most of this by reading books and the Internet. He was a distant figure for me, I had very little to do him, not being the first born son. That generation were a weird mob.
 

Mailman

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You'll be happy to know the Air Force kept the old Army Air Corps insignia.... slightly updated, but unmistakably the same.



View attachment 254839

I did not know that! It’s funny , I never knew much about my Dads military unit. I pieced it together from that grainy old photo , showing that shoulder patch, and what I knew about where he was stationed. It took me a while!
 

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I have probably lost as many knives as I have. But there are a few that I’ve had for a long time. One of the first I ever bought was a Swiss Arm Knife to replace my Boy Scout knife. I’ve had this Victorinox Explorer for about 50 years. It is always in my backpack and always at the ready.
Knife - Swiss.jpg


Like Mailman, I’ve also had a Buck folding knife since high school. This is a Buck 112. Thing is, this knife was so precious to me that I never used it for anything but cutting string and paper. It basically never got used. A Garage Queen of sorts. I would always pull out another knife if I was scraping paint off metal for a ground, or cleaning out a slotted screw. Eventually, is sat in its leather pouch and got tarnished from lack of use.
Knife - Buck.jpg


Next up is and Italian Jaguar. Simple knife with beautiful lines (less so since I’ve broken the tip off). This was a gift from my wife about 30 years ago. If I want to carry a simple blade, this is the one I take.

Knife - Italian Jaguar.jpg


Next up is a German pocket knife. For some reason, I carry this a lot in the fall. I think it is because of the hunting scene. Love the Phillips screwdriver on this knife (I know, it should be JIS).
Knife - Hunting scene.jpg


Another favorite is this French knife. These are often called Shepard’s Knives. It is my wine and cheese knife. If I am going to a gathering and I suspect there will be wine, I will have this knife at the ready. I really like this knife, but it is just a little too big to carry in a pocket.

Knife - French.jpg


This Kabar waiter’s knife is the one I most often carry. It gets a lot of use and abuse. It had a hard life before I bought it. This knife has served me well precisely because I don’t care if it gets lost or damaged. The exact opposite of the Buck that I cherished and didn’t use. There is probably a lesson here, but I’m to dense for that sort of enlightenment.
Knife - bartender.jpg
 

Mailman

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Nice! 😃 I love the Italian and the French ones.
My old Buck knife had that green corrosion on the brass too. I looked up the cause and it appears it’s bad to store knifes in their leather holsters. I now keep them wrapped in a piece of old t-shirt when I’m not using them.
 

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From top to bottom:
1. Victorinox, made in Switzerland. This was one of my father’s knives. He used it daily at work as a nurseryman. Holds an edge well. Dad used this for everything from cutting plants and trees to carving wood and used as a utility knife to cut panelling, cardboard etc.
2. Kershaw Cryo. Nice utility knife that holds an edge well. Has spring open assist for single handed operation. One of my favourites. Feels good in your hand. Lifetime warranty too. I think you can even send it back for sharpening.
3. Gerber Gator. Inexpensive knife, rubber handle. The SS blade doesn’t hold an edge very well. Ok for general use and wouldn’t break my heart if I lost or broke it. Serrated section is great for cutting rope.
4. Frontier Double Eagle. This is the first “good” knife I ever bought. At the time I thought it was quite expensive. Narrow blade that holds an edge well. Locks open and with a bit of practice you can operate the knife with one hand. Nice leather sheath too.
5. Spyderco all SS, with serrated lock blade. Was marketed as a knife for sailors. One handed operation is quite easy with the hole in the blade. The serrated blade cuts through rope easily. Broke the tip off and rather than throw the knife away, I shortened it by maybe 3/8”. Looks a bit odd but still works well. The serrated blade rarely needs to be sharpened.
 

toglhot

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Here's another six knives from my collection. The moment I saw them, just had to have them: The bloke I bought them from said they were French fighting knives from the 15th century. Very collectable, probably worth a fortune now to an avid collector.
 

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jetmechmarty

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Here's another six knives from my collection. The moment I saw them, just had to have them: The bloke I bought them from said they were French fighting knives from the 15th century. Very collectable, probably worth a fortune now to an avid collector.
Mmmmm…. I love butter!
 

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Have had many pocket knives in my life. My first one, long gone, my dad got for me for $.50 shipping and some Beechnut Chewing Tobacco wrappers.
Have had Barlow's and Buck type wood handled lock back's but my favorite these days is a Kershaw Leek, I have several with various handle treatments.
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Jan_P

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This is the standard knife for Construction sites back then everyone knows of
And I suppose every craftsman have at least one
Nowadays it may be a plastic handle Carbon steel poor quality at times around $ 2
Other stainless or better available $ 15 $ 30 ish

Mora Knife been around a long time It has no protection for the hand ( those are available ) not sliding down over the edge which is bad and poor design
Used for everything on construction sites
Connecting air condition pipes not always exactly round the knife was inserted and used to join them. Steel on steel not good for the edge
Splitting wood hammering on the backside of the knife.
It was not good to have a new sharp one . You cut yourself to much .Which happened when getting a new one
A slightly dull knife edge was better
Cheap and good quality


https://morakniv.se/en/this-is-morakniv/our-history/
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