1973 Super Rustbucket Resurrection

DogBunny

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I have the finishing touch for the Bike. Authentic period correct dual horns, bracket and attaching hardware. I know they are authentic because I just removed them from a 73.:D
View attachment 193665
Wow, those are ratty!
when i had no mufflers on my old 500/4 to dampen the noise i used chicken wire. Cut lengths about 10" wide and rolled them into a sausage like structure that was 10" long and tight enough that they wee a firm fit up the header. drilled a hole on the end of the pipe and used a nail through the pipe to stop the netting from blowing out.

Just riding around town the bike noise was acceptable, until i opened the throttle then it sounded great.

Didn't last a long time as the head would destroy the netting
View attachment 193666
That's a great idea. You just need something that will hold up better, like rabbit fencing or hardware cloth.
That sucks! You dont see those around much anymore. Especially the 74.
There isn't much demand for the fourth generation El Caminos, 1973-1977. Because they are big boats. Most got crushed. They are now beginning to look pretty cool, if you don't mind driving around in a big boat.
I'm enjoying your story very much.
I've got images of Hunter S. Thompson spinning in my head.

View attachment 193687
This is probably the most fun project that I've worked on.
 

DogBunny

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For a long time, I have been making my own brake lines. I have never seen this addressed here, so I'll say a few things now.

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There are are several big advantages to making your own lines, as opposed to buying made-up lines. The custom rear line that I made for the Texas Scorcher in the pic above, used uncommon 90-degree fittings on each end. You will never see a pre-made line like that. Plus, I could make the line exactly the length I wanted. Thirdly, the fittings on most pre-made lines do not swivel. This means that you may have to awkwardly twist the line to get the banjo bolt holes to orient, sometimes so much that the line becomes too short. When you make your own lines, you can get the fitting to align exactly like you want.

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https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000042761748.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.27424c4dYHcC1o
MikesXS sells a crazy expensive DIY brake line kit. The cheap way is to buy your line and your fittings from AliExpress. That's if you can wait for the slow boat from China. Above is the cheapest PTFE, AN3 hose in a decent quantity that I have found. It is good quality.

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https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000928245969.html
Likewise, get your fittings from AliExpress, for about $5 each. Above shows just a few of the possibilities, there are more. There are several very good how-tos on how to install the fittings on the line. It is easy, although it does require a bit of care and attention to detail.

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1973-1976 calipers do not use a banjo bolt fitting at the caliper. They use a flare nut fitting that the little pipe at the top of the pic screws into. You can buy made-up lines that will work, as shown above. But, your options will be very limited.

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https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000381857217.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.19414c4dvx4nVE
Instead, if you are making your lines, you can use this flare nut fitting. A female version is also available.

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Unfortunately, when the time came to make my line for the RustBucket, I did not have the flare nut fitting that I needed (I now have some on order). I wondered why couldn't you just use banjo bolt technology?

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https://www.ebay.com/itm/313527310420
XS650 banjo bolts, and most other banjo bolts, are M10 X 1.25. The flare nut fittings in 1973-1976 XS650 calipers are M10 X 1.0. So, you need to buy the somewhat hard-to-find banjo bolt above.

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The sealing surface on the RustBucket caliper was pretty rough and pitted as shown...

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Decisions, decisions. Which sealing washer is most likely to make a seal?

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I went with the rubberized washer. It works!
No alteration was made to the M10 x 1.0 banjo bolt, or to the caliper. The caliper body will still accept a flare nut fitting.
 
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GLJ

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Hel makes a premade line kit for XS2s. It comes with 2 banjo bolts and 4 washers for each end. Also has a much less severe bend for the caliper.
Last winter I changed out the caliper, used new washers and it leaked. What the hay, caliper not pitted like yours. Long story short what I found was the caliper was not machined as deep as my original and the bolt was bottoming out where the pipe flare would mate up. Ended up using a thicker copper washer and all was good then.
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DogBunny

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has a much less severe bend for the caliper.
Yes, but my brake line fits in the groove in the fender stay where the stock line went. Also, mine is a one-piece line. I broke that dang mounting stay where the stock two-piece line comes together back in post # 49.

Good to know about the HEL kit.
i kind of like this strategy for approaching rusttuckets.

It's a 33 minute video... I watched about ten minutes. Doesn't really apply to the RustBucket, but very good technique for removing heavy oxidation from paint while retaining patina. His secret is SOS soap pads, which seems to work much faster and with less effort than Rubbing Compound. Then he buffs -- I didn't see with what compound -- and puts linsead oil on the rust and bare spots.
 

Jim

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His secret is SOS soap pads, which seems to work much faster and with less effort than Rubbing Compound.
Others here may cringe at the thought, but SOS or Brillo pads are my go to for rusted chrome. The soap in the wool is the key I suspect, but clean with SOS and finish with Turtle Wax.... lovely. :smoke:
 

gggGary

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Every piece of original chrome on the SG resto was given the SOS/Turtle Wax treatment. Proof's in the puddin'.... she looked pretty good in the 2020 calendar. :smoke:
WJL looks pretty good "in the calendar" also. ;)
I used some 4 aught on a muffler one time removing a melted plastic blob. That learned me, never again. A true brass brush works pretty good at reducing the rust pimples without scratching. But I'm a butcher.
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gggGary

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Yes... looked damn good. Not sure your point though....? Never said my way was the only way.... :sneaky:
My point is not much of the original chrome on WJL is very good, it just looks good in calendar shots. There are some very nicely replated parts but the original not so much.
Just being a keyboard warrior... ;)
Yeah if it's far gone scrub away.
 

Jim

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I used some 4 aught on a muffler one time removing a melted plastic blob. That learned me, never again.
4 aught is a fair bit different from SOS or Brillo with the soap in it. I'm sure you have a rusty piece of chrome jus' layin' about. Experiment... expand your mind. :cool:
 

Mailman

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Oooh…..restoring crusty rusty burned on oil mufflers, I’ve spent way too much time doing this. First the burned on oil and road far. I soften it up with kerosene then using a single edge razor held at a very low angle, try to scrape off as much as you can. Then kerosene and fine steel wool. As for the rust spots, fine steel wool used with turtle wax chrome polish. Once the rust is removed it gets a good coat of paste wax to both shine and protect. Believe me my XS2 mufflers have seen better days but they shined up pretty nice!
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My header pipes had blued before I got it, and I was able to remove almost all of it , using Blue Magic and a lot of elbow grease!
 

xjwmx

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sos will matte down chrome, but it is good for medium shine on aluminum. would be good for initial cleaning of heavy rust on chrome, followed up by chrome polish and a small brass brush.

there is a knockoff version of the 3m green pad you can get from the dollar store that is a lot less abrasive than the original. someday i plan to try it instead of the brass brush. would hold more compound and solid brass brushes aren't easy to find (beware brass colored steel). i suspect the original 3m pad would matte chrome, but maybe not
 

xjwmx

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It's a 33 minute video... I watched about ten minutes. Doesn't really apply to the RustBucket, but very good technique for removing heavy oxidation from paint while retaining patina. His secret is SOS soap pads, which seems to work much faster and with less effort than Rubbing Compound. Then he buffs -- I didn't see with what compound -- and puts linsead oil on the rust and bare spots.

don't know how well it would work with a bike, hard to visualize. but looks great with that car. maybe a bike always looks best new as possible
 

gggGary

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Rings the repop, bucket is original.
:D
cuz I can see the scratches.
:cheers:
Not to mention I remember you cleaning and painting the inside of the bucket in your thread.
 

Jim

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Rings the repop, bucket is original.
:D
cuz I can see the scratches.
:cheers:
Not to mention I remember you cleaning and painting the inside of the bucket in your thread.
Well, since Mikes didn't sell a bucket back then, that was a gimmie. :sneaky:
Any scratches you see are from 40yrs of use, not from the SOS pad. :D
 

DogBunny

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Gonna try the SOS pads.
I'll just throw this out there -- for rusty chrome, I have always used crumpled aluminum foil, with either chrome polish or WD-40 or something as lube.
And for pipes that have melted shoe rubber or goo on them, Easy-Off oven cleaner.
Both are very traditional.
 
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