Getting the ‘57 beetle back on the road in 2024

Just a totally naive remark ... btw nice job!.. Remark diet pepi is handy phosphoric acid solution which I would slosh the derustoed bits in for 20 minutes or so, then rince, off to oven then to forestall hydrogen embrittlement, and then I would paint them... Now then, I may be a fool...sometimes, ahdunno...but I would see how that works. Again, very nice work!
 
If it's the plain ol' iron core charger, your instructions are mistaken.... It'll look for resistance to start up.
Want proof? Short the two leads together. That's a dead short... and the charger's ammeter will peg itself.
The charger must be more advanced than anticipated. I shorted the leads and nada. Then I hooked them up to a battery and the charger started. I immediately removed the leads and shorted them - big spark show, but immediately shut down. I’ll try it in the bath this afternoon as I picked up dome distilled water. $1.25/4L.
 
That means it has short/overload protection built in.... more advanced than the ancient one I have. :rolleyes:

Give it a shot. I still think it'll work without the battery hooked in.
Hooked everything up then a shock from the defibrillator and it’s passing current the same as the battery. Just needs a boost to get going. Cooking now, should be done by the evening. It will be interesting if the black film in on this piece now that I’m using distilled water.
Second backing plate is off. I think this is the worst of the two rears.

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Got one drum finished as well as one bearing / seal retainer. I’m learning quite a bit as I do this. I only wish I could keep the water warmer as I’m sure it’s slowing down the process. The distance between the cathode and anode makes a huge difference, if I move the part from the center of the pail, to a couple of inches from the anode, the current increases by at least 50%.
Frequent brushing really speeds up the process as @gggGary advised.
The use of distilled water kept things much “cleaner” too.
@Jim ,regarding the startup of my charger - as mentioned in my previous post I had to boost it to get it started, however, after it has run for a while I can disconnect the cables, scrub the part and if I put it back in fairly promptly, the charger will start again without a boost. Is the electrolyte bath holding a temporary charge?

It’s been good entertainment with pleasing results. Now I have to get painting.

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You're making amazing progress. :thumbsup:
Thanks, I’m trying to do a bit each day. Getting into a routine I can carry on through the winter. I’ll be strapped for space when my new old bike arrives in a week or so. I think the snowblower will have to live outside.
 
@Jim ,regarding the startup of my charger - as mentioned in my previous post I had to boost it to get it started, however, after it has run for a while I can disconnect the cables, scrub the part and if I put it back in fairly promptly, the charger will start again without a boost. Is the electrolyte bath holding a temporary charge?

I suppose it's possible. Not sure how though. A battery needs a positive and a negative plate 'tween the electrolyte. With the part out of the tank, you have just the one. Maybe some sorta capacitance action? But again, that wants two plates.... dunno. :umm:

Lookin' good btw.
thumbsup.gif
 
I suppose it's possible. Not sure how though. A battery needs a positive and a negative plate 'tween the electrolyte. With the part out of the tank, you have just the one. Maybe some sorta capacitance action? But again, that wants two plates.... dunno. :umm:

Lookin' good btw. View attachment 256171
Thx. Could be the old battery charger malfunctioning? Who knows.
 
Yeah, hard to say with your built in overload protection an' all that.

20-30 yrs ago when both my boys were still livin' here, we did an experiment where we made hydrogen (brown gas actually, not pure hydrogen). It involved pretty much the same procedure you're doing now. Once we got the ph of the water right, my ancient charger would jump to about 8-10 amps without any prodding.

I just remembered, that ol' charger shot craps about six months ago and I tossed it. Guess I shoulda kept it for these old school "experiments."
 
Yeah, hard to say with your built in overload protection an' all that.

20-30 yrs ago when both my boys were still livin' here, we did an experiment where we made hydrogen (brown gas actually, not pure hydrogen). It involved pretty much the same procedure you're doing now. Once we got the ph of the water right, my ancient charger would jump to about 8-10 amps without any prodding.

I just remembered, that ol' charger shot craps about six months ago and I tossed it. Guess I shoulda kept it for these old school "experiments."
I’ve wondered how much hydrogen is actually produced in the process and how risky is it to run in my garage. It’s 20x22 ft with an open ceiling. I have a powered roof vent that I’m sure would clear the gases but I literally plug it up for the winter so cold air doesn’t drop down into the garage. It can be removed I suppose until I get my de-rusting completed. Also thought about building a fume hood with a pusher fan (fan motor would be downstream of the pail).
I’ll have a look at my roof vent tomorrow. Maybe I can attach a 4” flexible hose to the plug and dangle that over the bath. Only trouble is the only way I’ll find out it wasn’t sufficient ventilation is the garage blows up. Lol.
 
Been running my bath next to the basement wood stove... :yikes:
House is still here................:rolleyes:
I wonder if that’s a good thing? Maybe the hydrogen is being burned off as it’s generated, not having time to accumulate and become concentrated. Any fresh air draft for the stove may suck in the gases. I understand the chemical process also generates oxygen. Maybe that why the wood burns so well 🙃
 
Pretty much long as it's not stagnant air it'll be fine?
Never blown up a charging battery either. same process.
Did have a bud blow up a battery in his face trying to jump a Corvair solenoid with a pair of pliers. He never was the sharpest tool...
Literally, his screwdrivers all rounded off cuz he used them as chisels too.
:lmao:

Lost his eyebrows but had beer handy to rinse his eyes out, coincidence? I don't think so. :unsure:
 
Pretty much long as it's not stagnant air it'll be fine?
Never blown up a charging battery either. same process.
Did have a bud blow up a battery in his face trying to jump a Corvair solenoid with a pair of pliers. He never was the sharpest tool...
Literally, his screwdrivers all rounded off cuz he used them as chisels too.
:lmao:

Lost his eyebrows but had beer handy to rinse his eyes out, coincidence? I don't think so. :unsure:
When I was a young feller, one of my first summer jobs was working at a nursery and the tractor I was driving ran a 6V system. Well the tractor died in the middle of the field and I thought I’d be smart and boost it with another (12V) tractor. Didn’t end well. I didn’t take the necessary precautions and the 6V battery grenaded in my face. I walked away embarrassed but unscathed. Thinking back of all the dumb things I’ve done in my life, it’s a wonder I’m still here, with most things still attached and working relatively well.
 
I ran 6 volt starters on 12 volt (converted) VW's for years. They work really good!
If I were to dope up a electric gizmo such as the one you've made, I would begin with a variac
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and a rectified transformer...I'd try a doorbell transformer and a pair of diodes salvaged from a car alternator. My oldest VW was a split window '62 bus...an ah miss th' ol' gal...went with divorce... cheap.
Nice work there amigo!
 
Got one drum finished as well as one bearing / seal retainer. I’m learning quite a bit as I do this. I only wish I could keep the water warmer as I’m sure it’s slowing down the process. The distance between the cathode and anode makes a huge difference, if I move the part from the center of the pail, to a couple of inches from the anode, the current increases by at least 50%.
Frequent brushing really speeds up the process as @gggGary advised.
The use of distilled water kept things much “cleaner” too.
@Jim ,regarding the startup of my charger - as mentioned in my previous post I had to boost it to get it started, however, after it has run for a while I can disconnect the cables, scrub the part and if I put it back in fairly promptly, the charger will start again without a boost. Is the electrolyte bath holding a temporary charge?

It’s been good entertainment with pleasing results. Now I have to get painting.

View attachment 256163View attachment 256164View attachment 256165View attachment 256166
the delay and boost to start, etc, occurs because it takes time and energy to form the ionized fluid pathway, it's a physical delay, once the pathway is established sloshing can disrupt it, as can the slightly heated fluid rise and cause autostir... I wouldn't worry, but it's fun to watch, eh! I am learning a practical thing, thanks.
 
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